It makes sense that apple cider vinegar (ACV), which effectively works as a natural antibiotic and teeth/gum cleanser, would also be able to remove stubborn stains on the teeth. ACV is especially helpful for removing stains due to common culprits like coffee and nicotine (smoking). Some report that after using ACV it looks like you just got your teeth professionally cleaned!

Avoid smoking. Cigarettes and chewing tobacco are harmful to your oral health as they can cause stained teeth, gum disease, oral cancer, slow healing after a tooth extraction or surgery which increases the risk of dry socket, a dulled sense of taste and smell and bad breath.[14] Quitting is the only way to decrease your risk of these and other-tobacco related health problems.
Thank you for stopping by to offer your input to this conversation. Thank goodness we all don’t want the same thing, right? I suppose I’m much more cautious and dubious of the dental profession than you express here. Given that the dental profession still sings the praises of fluoride and mercury amalgam fillings despite tremendous research proving their dangers, I’m frankly not sure the reasoning you pose here is sound (from my humble, yet very opinionated opinion).
An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. Foods including dark berries and drinks such as coffee, red wine, and soda are known offenders, but you don't have to give them up. Enjoy these in moderation, and rinse with water right afterward so there's less chance they'll affect your teeth. (Wait 30 minutes before brushing to protect the enamel.)
Pick the right toothbrush. Both manual and electric powered toothbrushes can effectively clean teeth.[5] People who have difficulty using a manual toothbrush may find powered toothbrushes easier to use but you will still need to learn how to use it properly to avoid gum recession over time. Your dentist can help you decide which type is best suited to your needs.
Paint-ons appeared on the scene around the same time as whitening pens and brushes, with success rates varying by formulation. Both user-friendly and convenient, a sealed delivery system is required to avoid harmful byproducts of carbamide peroxide breakdowns. The good news is paint-ons can be targeted to the teeth, thereby avoiding contact with the soft tissue which often results in sensitivity and irritation. It’s best to look for a gel that does not migrate from the tooth. However, because this method does not involve a closed system, there’s no way to prevent whitening oxygens from escaping, which means you can expect to see results in a couple of months. This whitening method also requires patience and the commitment to use for consecutive days. It’s a good option if you have two months to whiten.

Give hydrogen peroxide a try. Many commercial mouthwashes and toothpastes have a 1.5% concentration of hydrogen peroxide, a powerful bleaching agent with a chemical composition that is incredibly close to water. This can help whiten your teeth.[20][21] Hydrogen peroxide also helps kill bacteria, wash away debris and is especially useful to prevent gingivitis.
Limit your intake of fruits that contain citric acid, such as oranges, lemons, berries and tomatoes. Too much citric acid can cause enamel erosion.[27] However, don’t completely avoid these fruits unless you have a digestive condition or allergy. These fruits contain many nutrients that are essential for bodily functions and contribute to creating a strong immune system.
Baking Soda isn’t a shocker here. Sodium bicarbonate (its official name) is mildly abrasive; gently scrubbing away surface stains to return teeth to a whiter shade. It’s also very alkaline (the opposite of acidic) so I would think if you have a very acidic mouth or eat a lot of acidic food, it could help balance out the Ph, which would be useful as acid breaks down enamel-this is strictly speculation on my part. It will also reduce the acidity of the lemon juice, which acts as a natural bleach of sorts. I use a mixture of baking soda and water on some days, and use the lemon juice on others, as I don’t want to overdo it.

Activated charcoal, an absorbing product used to trap toxins inside the body, may help whiten your teeth by absorbing plaque and microscopic tidbits that cause staining. To whiten your teeth naturally with charcoal, wet a toothbrush and dip into powdered activated charcoal. Brush teeth as normal, paying special attention to areas showing the most staining. Sip a bit of water, swish through mouth thoroughly and spit. Rinse well, until spit is clear. For best results, brush your teeth with activated charcoal two to three times per week, but avoid using it if you have crowns, caps or porcelain veneers.
I have used all of these methods to naturally whiten teeth at one time or another and have found that since most of these are included in my diet or what I use for oral hygiene,  my teeth have remained pretty white and I haven’t had to spend extra trying to whiten them. These ways to naturally whiten teeth can be used daily or weekly to keep your teeth nice and white.
2. The second consideration on this subject is whether oil pulling is going to compromise any existing fillings (mercury or composite). This is another myth circulating on this subject. If a filling becomes compromised from oil pulling, then it was compromised already and the oil pulling simply helped it along its path to failure. In other words, oil pulling will not cause a properly placed filling to become weaker. However, if a filling is weak (and therefore should be changed as it’s not doing its job to restore the tooth), then we can see how oil pulling could further weaken the filling and increase its speed of failure. I consider this a benefit as the filling in question was already compromised and needs to be changed but we may have not been aware that it had already failed.
One simple strategy can help maintain white teeth: brush. Brush at least twice daily. Even better, brush after every meal and snack. Brushing helps prevent stains and yellow teeth, especially at the gum line. Both electric and sonic toothbrushes may be superior to traditional toothbrushes in removing plaque and surface stains on teeth. Also, don't forget to floss and use an antiseptic mouthwash daily.
Whilst these remedies might be “natural” and might show results for “whiter” teeth, they are not healthy for the oral cavity. Although products such as baking soda have been used as home care adjuncts for decades, it can be destructive to both the teeth and gums. Baking soda is much too abrasive to use on the teeth. You might not see negative results after one use, but long-term use can cause abrasion and recession. Abrasion and recession can then lead to tooth sensitivity, cavities, and most importantly periodontal disease (which would render treatment more costly than professional whitening). Also-when whitening, you are not changing the color of the enamel. Whitening targets the dentin of the tooth not the enamel. However, I agree that it is important to use products to strengthen enamel. Products containing fluoride are great for strengthening the enamel.
i usually go to the dentist to whiten my teeth, every 2 months. But does anyone know if these great ideas actually work? because that would be so wonderful if they do. i was reading this other article the other day and it said for the lemon and baking soda to not keep it on for over 30 seconds. I was just wondering if anyone tried them and had some feedback.

Although there are many options  to whiten teeth, all of the kits you can purchase over the counter are loaded with harmful chemicals. The chemical tooth whiteners typically contain coal tars, aspartame, aluminum, floride and benzene.  The over the counter bleaches also have a very high acidity and are very abrasive which can cause damage to teeth, tooth pain and/or sensitivity, and damage the enamel. Not only are these chemicals harmful to your teeth and gums, the toxic chemicals often leak from the trays or strips and are swallowed or absorbed. As a result of the dangerous side effects and hazards with over the counter whitening, many are now opting to choose methods to naturally whiten teeth.
I have been using the bass toothbrush for a while and love it!! It has helped my gums a lot. I am also using it on my dog. I know weird 😉 right? But he is a terrier cross and had build up on the canine teeth as well as some of the others. So to save him from having to go to the vet for cleaning I started using the Bass brush on him with coconut oil. At first there was bleeding but now after a couple of months teeth are white and no more bleeding. Does he wag his tail with joy when I get out the toothbrush ? NO, but he doesn’t run either. He acts like it actually feels good. Just remember not to use baking soda as it doesn’t do well with dogs and be careful with essential oils. So to be safe I just use the coconut oil.

As oil pulling doesn’t involve any of these methods of increasing the stimulation of the amalgam, I see no reason to avoid oil pulling with amalgam fillings. To add to that, even if oil pulling stimulated the mercury to liberate, the fact is you are oil pulling to capture toxins and remove them from the body. Now, I realize that I’m assuming that oil in the mouth would help tie up any ‘extra’ mercury liberated and I don’t know if this is true. But it seems reasonable to me to think that IF more mercury is liberated from oil pulling that the oil/process itself would help bind the vapor and you’d spit it out.

Avoiding smoking cigarettes, drinking too much coffee and/or soda, improving your oral hygiene overall, and eating a healthy diet can all also help prevent yellow teeth. If you do regularly drink staining beverages, do so through a straw and try to cut back. Try to drink more plain water after eating or drinking something staining or acidic to help reduce the negative effects.
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