Thanks for the supportive words. It’s fine to oil pull with amalgam fillings. It’s important to grasp that amalgam fillings off gas 24/7. They give off more mercury vapor when stimulated. Most common ‘stimulants’ are hot drinks, brushing, dental cleanings, and chewing. I really don’t think that oil pulling would increase the risk of mercury vapor. And even if it did, my guess is the oil would tie it up and you spit out the mercury with the oil.
Xylitol from birch is the best. Shelly, the role of xylitol in reversing tooth decay is that it helps correct the ph in your mouth. This is most important for anyone who has any metal fillings, retainers or other dental work. I’ve healed a cavity naturally by using xylitol as a part of my oral health routine. It is not a cure all, and xylitol from corn is not the same as xylitol from birch bark. With any metal work in your mouth, you are almost ensuring you will need more dental work, unless you work very hard to keep the ph of your mouth correct.
I have used all of these methods to naturally whiten teeth at one time or another and have found that since most of these are included in my diet or what I use for oral hygiene,  my teeth have remained pretty white and I haven’t had to spend extra trying to whiten them. These ways to naturally whiten teeth can be used daily or weekly to keep your teeth nice and white.

Paint or brush on formulas are among the cheapest methods to whiten your teeth, usually about 5-10 US dollars (USD) at a local drugstore. After brushing your teeth in the morning or evening, you simply apply a whitening formula to the teeth. This will probably work on teeth that only need to be lightened a few shades. Very yellow teeth, and teeth stained through use of medications like tetracycline are unlikely to respond to this method.
Is it crucial to oil pull for the full 15-20 minutes and EVERY day or would every other or less time daily be effective??? I have a hard time seeing how to add 20 minutes to my day, so I have yet to give this one a try. I did try the turmeric and the charcoal on my teeth (at different times) but found not much improvement, but a large mess! Thanks for your info!
Whiter teeth, like thick, shiny, hair, is something that many people in our cosmetically driven world desire today. In fact, Americans spend over $1.4 billion dollars in over-the-counter teeth whitening products every year-that’s a good chunk of money just to achieve a different shade of teeth. I’ll be the first to admit that I’ve tried OTC teeth whitener-I even paid to have my dentist do it once. It worked for a bit, but my teeth got so sensitive I couldn’t stand it. I also felt I really didn’t need to be so obsessed with the color of my teeth that I paid a bunch of money for a bunch of who-knows-what that made my teeth hurt, so I started looking into more natural alternatives. With a bit of patience, I think you can naturally restore whiteness to your teeth. They may not get to be scary sear-out-somebodies-corneas –when-you –smile white, but they’ll appear more like you took good care of your pretty pearly whites rather than just bleaching them like crazy.
Once I became pregnant with our first child, I was careful to avoid all chemicals, including those normally used to whiten teeth. I wanted to find natural ways to whiten my teeth that not only worked well, but were also safe. Since chemicals can easily absorb through the sensitive skin in the mouth, I wanted to only use options that were safe enough to eat.
To figure out how to whiten our teeth, we have to know why they get yellow in the first place. There are several factors that play a part, including genetics, what kind of food and drink you consume, and how well you practice oral hygiene. A tooth is made up of 4 tissues-enamel, which is the strong white covering that protects the tooth, dentin, which supports the enamel and is a hard yellow material that carries nerves, pulp, which is at the center of the tooth and contains blood and lymph vessels, and cementum, which covers the root of the tooth.
Great questions! Oil pulling is an ancient cleansing and detoxifying technique from Ayurvedic medicine, the traditional medicine of India. The process is simply to vigorously swish (also known as “pull”) unrefined oils (usually coconut or sesame oil) throughout the mouth for several minutes. Similar to what oil does in a car engine, oil pulling gathers all sorts of debris like bacteria, fungi, and viruses (aka bad bugs) into the oil to be spit out. Some people also like to do oil pulling to help remove stains so that their teeth appear whiter.
Perhaps the intensity of the heat in the professional whitening lights is the culprit? Or maybe your sensitivity and irritation is caused by the caustic breakdown of the carbamide peroxide formula used in tray and gel whitening methods? No matter what the source of the discomfort is, here are some facts to help guide you in making the right choice when it comes to your preferred method of whitening:

Underneath the enamel is a pale brown substance called dentin, which can become more visible when enamel gets thinner — a very common occurrence for many adults. (2) Dental erosion (erosive tooth wear) results from chronic loss of dental hard tissue that is chemically etched away from the tooth surface by acid and/or chelation (without bacterial involvement). (3) What are some of the reasons enamel thins? Risk factors include aging, genetics and intake of foods that promote erosion and/or staining. Many of these same unhealthy habits also increase your risk for gum disease.

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