Whitening strips revolutionized the industry 10 years ago, as researchers figured out how to impregnate hydrogen peroxide on a polyethylene strip that the user places directly on the teeth. This product has existed in several iterations over the years. The various types of strips have differed in terms of the level of hydrogen peroxide in the gel to modifications in the shape and thicknesses of the strip. The efficacy is excellent for an OTC product, but you must be cautious not to burn your fingers or rest the strip on the gums, as this will cause irritation over time. If you are patient and compliant, you’ll see results in a few weeks. This method is best if you have two weeks to whiten.


As oil pulling doesn’t involve any of these methods of increasing the stimulation of the amalgam, I see no reason to avoid oil pulling with amalgam fillings. To add to that, even if oil pulling stimulated the mercury to liberate, the fact is you are oil pulling to capture toxins and remove them from the body. Now, I realize that I’m assuming that oil in the mouth would help tie up any ‘extra’ mercury liberated and I don’t know if this is true. But it seems reasonable to me to think that IF more mercury is liberated from oil pulling that the oil/process itself would help bind the vapor and you’d spit it out.
Over-the-counter tray and gels have been around the longest. Known as a “boil and bite” system, they require you to heat a tray, fill it with gel, and place the formed tray in your mouth. This whitening method takes weeks to deliver results, and 80 percent of users report sensitivity due to the breakdown of the carbamide peroxide gel. While the tray helps prevent oxygen from escaping, there are other options that can lead to efficacious whitening without the soft tissue irritation and pain. 
If you have only minimal staining, whitening toothpaste is clearly the easiest way to whiten your teeth at home. Brushing two to three times a day can whiten your teeth four to five shades after about a month of consistent use. Formulas for tooth whitening toothpaste are all about equivalent in effect, but kids under 16 should not use them. They can cause irritation to the gums and teeth of younger kids.
Some people still prefer the age-old home remedy of baking soda and a toothbrush to gently whiten teeth at home. Also, some foods such as celery, apples, pears, and carrots trigger lots of saliva, which helps wash away food debris on your teeth. Chewing sugarless gum is a tooth-cleansing action and also triggers saliva. A bonus from all that saliva: It neutralizes the acid that causes tooth decay. With teeth, more saliva is better all around.
Over-the-counter tray and gels have been around the longest. Known as a “boil and bite” system, they require you to heat a tray, fill it with gel, and place the formed tray in your mouth. This whitening method takes weeks to deliver results, and 80 percent of users report sensitivity due to the breakdown of the carbamide peroxide gel. While the tray helps prevent oxygen from escaping, there are other options that can lead to efficacious whitening without the soft tissue irritation and pain. 
However, it might help to know that you can do lots of other activities while oil pulling. For example, I’m sitting here answering your questions on my computer and I could be oil pulling. Sometimes I oil pull while taking a shower. So, there’s no reason to not ‘double up’ and oil pull while doing other routine activities like surfing the net, watching a movie, reading, etc. In fact, sometimes I find that I oil pull for longer than 15-20 min because of the other activity.
Thanks for the supportive words. It’s fine to oil pull with amalgam fillings. It’s important to grasp that amalgam fillings off gas 24/7. They give off more mercury vapor when stimulated. Most common ‘stimulants’ are hot drinks, brushing, dental cleanings, and chewing. I really don’t think that oil pulling would increase the risk of mercury vapor. And even if it did, my guess is the oil would tie it up and you spit out the mercury with the oil.
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The reason oil pulling works to help whiten teeth is similar to what oil is doing in your car’s engine.  Think about it.  When the oil in your car is changed, the clean oil going in is, well, clean.  And the used oil that leaves your car is all gunky.  That gunk is any waste from the engine running being gathered up and removed from the engine by the oil.
Now that you are armed with these facts, let’s take a look at the various whitening options available in the market today. Professional whitening procedures provide the most efficacious results, especially when followed up by an at-home regimen to stabilize the whitening (think, high frequency, low intensity). For those who don’t have the extra money to spend on professional treatments, let’s take a look at the four categories currently available in over-the-counter today and which one to use based on how much time you have to commit to a whitening regimen. 
I know this sounds absolutely mad (I thought it was crazy too when I first read about it) but rinsing your mouth with coconut oil (called ‘oil pulling’) is a unique, old, remedy that people swear by to help whiten teeth. It doesn’t sound like the most pleasant thing in the world, but I actually don’t mind the taste, and I think it does make a difference in the color of your teeth. It won’t make a difference by “bleaching” per say, but lauric acid in coconut oil can rid your teeth of bacteria found in plaque that can make them yellow. It is also supposed to promote gum health, and help keep your breath fresh.
I called many American Companies like mountain rose herbs , redmond clay ,aztec clay and when I asked them about lead in their clay they said that every clay comes from the earth and that is why there is tiny amount lead in the clay, but it occurs naturally so it is bind with other elements in the clay and does not leak in the human body , so the human body can not absorb the naturally occuring lead in clay.
I know this sounds absolutely mad (I thought it was crazy too when I first read about it) but rinsing your mouth with coconut oil (called ‘oil pulling’) is a unique, old, remedy that people swear by to help whiten teeth. It doesn’t sound like the most pleasant thing in the world, but I actually don’t mind the taste, and I think it does make a difference in the color of your teeth. It won’t make a difference by “bleaching” per say, but lauric acid in coconut oil can rid your teeth of bacteria found in plaque that can make them yellow. It is also supposed to promote gum health, and help keep your breath fresh.

The baking soda works on the enamel of the teeth to lift away the staining while the citric acid in the lemon juice provides a natural bleaching action. You can make a baking soda paste by adding some water to it, and use on your toothbrush, or you can blend the baking soda with your toothpaste. Step1 Mix baking soda and the juice from a fresh squeezed lime, you want to use enough lime juice to bring the baking soda to the consistency of a paste. You can use baking soda, instead of salt, to make it more effective. Different theories exist on the benefits of adding lemon juice or strawberries to baking soda for teeth whitening. All you have to do is take a little of baking soda and make a paste by mixing it with some water and a dash of salt.
Underneath the enamel is a pale brown substance called dentin, which can become more visible when enamel gets thinner — a very common occurrence for many adults. (2) Dental erosion (erosive tooth wear) results from chronic loss of dental hard tissue that is chemically etched away from the tooth surface by acid and/or chelation (without bacterial involvement). (3) What are some of the reasons enamel thins? Risk factors include aging, genetics and intake of foods that promote erosion and/or staining. Many of these same unhealthy habits also increase your risk for gum disease.
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