Pick the right toothbrush. Both manual and electric powered toothbrushes can effectively clean teeth.[5] People who have difficulty using a manual toothbrush may find powered toothbrushes easier to use but you will still need to learn how to use it properly to avoid gum recession over time. Your dentist can help you decide which type is best suited to your needs.
I think you are right on with your thinking here. Incidentally, on the Mohr’s scale of hardness (where diamonds are 10), ironically activated charcoal is only around 2. However, your point about RDA for charcoal is another subject all together. I don’t know the RDA for activated charcoal by itself, but my guess is it’s pretty high. My reasoning for this guess is a company who makes a tooth powder that uses activated charcoal as one of it’s ingredients states that the RDA for their product is 117. Yikes! Sure, it’s lower than some ‘whitening’ commercial pastes on the market, but that’s not a very high standard to judge one’s product safety.
Calcium supplements derived from oyster shells, dolomite, and bone meal are best avoided as they may contain lead, which can cause anemia, damage to the brain and kidneys, raise blood pressure and cause poisoning. Calculus (tartar) on your teeth may also increase while using these supplements, so visit your dentist for a cleaning whenever you feel the deposits on your lower front teeth.
Tooth-whitening strips will help get rid of tooth stains. These strips are very thin, virtually invisible, and are coated with a peroxide-based whitening gel. You wear them a few minutes daily for a week or more. Results are visible in just a few days, and last at least a year. The results with strips are not as dramatic as with whitening kits, but the strips are easy to use and pretty much foolproof.

The key to using ACV for teeth whitening is to be consistent, using it for at least a month continuously in order to see the best results. However, be careful, as with all acids it can remove the enamel on your teeth if you brush too hard or use too much. After brushing with ACV, you need to brush again with regular toothpaste, preferably a non-fluoride paste, or rinse your mouth out well. 
Perhaps the intensity of the heat in the professional whitening lights is the culprit? Or maybe your sensitivity and irritation is caused by the caustic breakdown of the carbamide peroxide formula used in tray and gel whitening methods? No matter what the source of the discomfort is, here are some facts to help guide you in making the right choice when it comes to your preferred method of whitening:
Activated charcoal, an absorbing product used to trap toxins inside the body, may help whiten your teeth by absorbing plaque and microscopic tidbits that cause staining. To whiten your teeth naturally with charcoal, wet a toothbrush and dip into powdered activated charcoal. Brush teeth as normal, paying special attention to areas showing the most staining. Sip a bit of water, swish through mouth thoroughly and spit. Rinse well, until spit is clear. For best results, brush your teeth with activated charcoal two to three times per week, but avoid using it if you have crowns, caps or porcelain veneers.
Malic acid in apples boosts saliva to wash away acids. Toothpastes with bromelain, a compound in pineapple, help whiten teeth. But there's no evidence that eating these fruits will make your grin gleam. Skip the strawberries, too. A study in Operative Dentistry found that brushing with a mixture of them and baking soda had no whitening effects. Even worse, the citric acid in strawberries can break down enamel, the outer shell of your tooth.
Lori Ryman, BS, MS, has been dedicated to researching natural alternatives for the past 15 years. Lori has a background in research methods, health, and nutrition. She started with an Interest in natural alternatives to improve her own health and she continues to share natural DIY projects, recipes and natural alternatives with millions of viewers on healthextremist.com.

Some people still prefer the age-old home remedy of baking soda and a toothbrush to gently whiten teeth at home. Also, some foods such as celery, apples, pears, and carrots trigger lots of saliva, which helps wash away food debris on your teeth. Chewing sugarless gum is a tooth-cleansing action and also triggers saliva. A bonus from all that saliva: It neutralizes the acid that causes tooth decay. With teeth, more saliva is better all around.
Xylitol from birch is the best. Shelly, the role of xylitol in reversing tooth decay is that it helps correct the ph in your mouth. This is most important for anyone who has any metal fillings, retainers or other dental work. I’ve healed a cavity naturally by using xylitol as a part of my oral health routine. It is not a cure all, and xylitol from corn is not the same as xylitol from birch bark. With any metal work in your mouth, you are almost ensuring you will need more dental work, unless you work very hard to keep the ph of your mouth correct.
Once I became pregnant with our first child, I was careful to avoid all chemicals, including those normally used to whiten teeth. I wanted to find natural ways to whiten my teeth that not only worked well, but were also safe. Since chemicals can easily absorb through the sensitive skin in the mouth, I wanted to only use options that were safe enough to eat.

Thanks for the supportive words. It’s fine to oil pull with amalgam fillings. It’s important to grasp that amalgam fillings off gas 24/7. They give off more mercury vapor when stimulated. Most common ‘stimulants’ are hot drinks, brushing, dental cleanings, and chewing. I really don’t think that oil pulling would increase the risk of mercury vapor. And even if it did, my guess is the oil would tie it up and you spit out the mercury with the oil.
You can also try a few home remedies to whiten your teeth, though not all dentists recommend them. Brushing the teeth with baking soda can produce slightly lighter shades. You can also brush with no greater than 10% strength hydrogen peroxide. For drug store methods, gel kits are thought most effective, and brush on teeth whitener the least. However, with minimal tooth yellowing, over the counter remedies are less expensive than dental whitening, and may provide you with the lighter shade you desire.
Although there are many options  to whiten teeth, all of the kits you can purchase over the counter are loaded with harmful chemicals. The chemical tooth whiteners typically contain coal tars, aspartame, aluminum, floride and benzene.  The over the counter bleaches also have a very high acidity and are very abrasive which can cause damage to teeth, tooth pain and/or sensitivity, and damage the enamel. Not only are these chemicals harmful to your teeth and gums, the toxic chemicals often leak from the trays or strips and are swallowed or absorbed. As a result of the dangerous side effects and hazards with over the counter whitening, many are now opting to choose methods to naturally whiten teeth.

So I bought crest whitening in 5 days, I noted a difference but my teeth are definitely sensitive as notced brushing yestersday. my mom told me about baking soda and peroxide. As I know myself… I love doing my research so I got up this morning to brush and thought about it,… decided to google and saw this page. thank God I have coco nut oil, baking soda and lemon juice already at home. I just need straberries and peroxide. rigtht now I have had the coconut oil in my mouth for 15 mins. soon to remove and brush with baking soda and lemon. mix. I just bought the E-book for 215 home remedies which comes with so many other benefits. I am thrilled… to start usng this as see how it works. for All I care.. the toothpaste in my bathroom can go to Heaven lol.. well I will give it out of course. Thank you guys for all the comments.. very helpful. I will definitely update my progress.. here as I go natural on my remedies. wish me Luck!!
First, I’m sorry if the article was confusing on this aspect of it. With this part of the article on activated charcoal, we were simply expressing our personal concerns about the potential risks of daily use of activated charcoal. You see, warnings exist against using activated charcoal internally daily because it can inhibit absorption of vitamins and minerals. So, from our perspective, the same warning could be applied to regular use in the mouth.

Over-the-counter tray and gels have been around the longest. Known as a “boil and bite” system, they require you to heat a tray, fill it with gel, and place the formed tray in your mouth. This whitening method takes weeks to deliver results, and 80 percent of users report sensitivity due to the breakdown of the carbamide peroxide gel. While the tray helps prevent oxygen from escaping, there are other options that can lead to efficacious whitening without the soft tissue irritation and pain. 
The reason oil pulling works to help whiten teeth is similar to what oil is doing in your car’s engine.  Think about it.  When the oil in your car is changed, the clean oil going in is, well, clean.  And the used oil that leaves your car is all gunky.  That gunk is any waste from the engine running being gathered up and removed from the engine by the oil.
Similarly to apple cider vinegar, some swear that using citrus fruits — including lemon and/or orange peels, or lemon essential oil, which contain beneficial acids — also does the trick for whitening teeth. These foods overall are very healthy, such as benefiting digestion due to regulating levels of stomach acid, but the high acid content can also eventually wear away the enamel on the teeth if used too aggressively. Like with ACV, if you use lemon or orange peel on your teeth, always rinse your mouth afterward to be on the safe side. Use the hydrogen peroxide oral rinse formula described above for best results.
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