Activated charcoal, an absorbing product used to trap toxins inside the body, may help whiten your teeth by absorbing plaque and microscopic tidbits that cause staining. To whiten your teeth naturally with charcoal, wet a toothbrush and dip into powdered activated charcoal. Brush teeth as normal, paying special attention to areas showing the most staining. Sip a bit of water, swish through mouth thoroughly and spit. Rinse well, until spit is clear. For best results, brush your teeth with activated charcoal two to three times per week, but avoid using it if you have crowns, caps or porcelain veneers.
Chew a piece of gum. Studies show that chewing sugar-free gum that contains xylitol for 20 minutes a day following meals can help prevent tooth decay.[22] Chewing gum increases saliva production which in turn washes away food debris, neutralizes acids produced by bacteria, strengthens tooth enamel, and provides disease-fighting substances throughout the mouth.

If I were in the shoes of a person with this situation, I would exhaust natural methods first before shifting to bleaching. For example, I’d do a ’30 day oil pulling’ commitment for myself. Everyday for a month, I’d oil pull and take ‘before and after’ photos so I could see the changes. That way, if I still wasn’t satisfied with the whiteness, I would know that I had tried less invasive strategies prior to choosing a method that may challenge my teeth.
Do you happen to know the RDA / hardness of activated charcoal? It seems like it would be way too abrasive and hard to brush your teeth with. Perhaps the disparity of reports between users is that some are just swishing it around, while others are brushing it into their teeth, which, at that point, seems like it would not be the actual characteristics of the charcoal doing the whitening, as it would instead be the abrasive quality of it in general. (After all, diamonds are made of carbon too…)

As oil pulling doesn’t involve any of these methods of increasing the stimulation of the amalgam, I see no reason to avoid oil pulling with amalgam fillings. To add to that, even if oil pulling stimulated the mercury to liberate, the fact is you are oil pulling to capture toxins and remove them from the body. Now, I realize that I’m assuming that oil in the mouth would help tie up any ‘extra’ mercury liberated and I don’t know if this is true. But it seems reasonable to me to think that IF more mercury is liberated from oil pulling that the oil/process itself would help bind the vapor and you’d spit it out.
As oil pulling doesn’t involve any of these methods of increasing the stimulation of the amalgam, I see no reason to avoid oil pulling with amalgam fillings. To add to that, even if oil pulling stimulated the mercury to liberate, the fact is you are oil pulling to capture toxins and remove them from the body. Now, I realize that I’m assuming that oil in the mouth would help tie up any ‘extra’ mercury liberated and I don’t know if this is true. But it seems reasonable to me to think that IF more mercury is liberated from oil pulling that the oil/process itself would help bind the vapor and you’d spit it out.
Terri, it really is 10 to 15 minutes. During that time, your mouth will get fuller and fuller as more of your natural saliva is generated and added to the oil already in your mouth – by the end of the oil pulling session, you will have twice as much in your mouth as the tablespoon you start with, and this can be hard at first. I had to work up to that tablespoon to be able to keep it in my mouth for 10 minutes; I started with about a half tablespoon.
Once I became pregnant with our first child, I was careful to avoid all chemicals, including those normally used to whiten teeth. I wanted to find natural ways to whiten my teeth that not only worked well, but were also safe. Since chemicals can easily absorb through the sensitive skin in the mouth, I wanted to only use options that were safe enough to eat.

In the morning, before you brush your teeth, scoop out a tablespoon or a little less (depending on the size of your mouth) of coconut oil. You can either soften it, or just put it in your mouth (I usually do the latter, and just let it soften.) Push, swish, and “pull” the oil through and around your teeth for 10-15 minutes, then spit it out, rinse with water, and brush your teeth.


Katie Wells, CTNC, MCHC, Founder and CEO of Wellness Mama, has a background in research, journalism, and nutrition. As a mom of six, she turned to research and took health into her own hands to find answers to her health problems. WellnessMama.com is the culmination of her thousands of hours of research and all posts are medically reviewed and verified by the Wellness Mama research team. Katie is also the author of the bestselling books The Wellness Mama Cookbook and The Wellness Mama 5-Step Lifestyle Detox.
Whitening toothpastes usually contain mild abrasives that are typically mineral compounds such as magnesium carbonate, hydrated aluminum oxides and calcium carbonate. These help remove surface stains that cause yellowing and help you to achieve a brighter tooth surface. Whitening toothpastes also often contain a small percentage of hydrogen peroxide, a bleaching agent that helps remove stains.
6. Oil Pulling: Oil pulling is an Ayurvedic technique which has been used to benefit oral health, prevent and treat cavities, reduce plaque, improve gums and even whiten teeth. Oil pulling is when you swish a spoonful of quality oil in your mouth for up to 15 minutes. Then rinse your mouth. Sesame oil or coconut oil can be used, just to name a few.
Given all the mixed press on hydrogen peroxide, it may be helpful to know that the human body produces hydrogen peroxide primarily in the lungs, gut and thyroid gland.  A fascinating study done in 2009 at Harvard University suggests that the presence of hydrogen peroxide actually ‘calls’ the immune system to an injury. (3)  This makes sense when you consider that hydrogen peroxide is such a biologically fundamental ‘defense’ strategy at a cellular level.
Can it be true? Coconut oil to clean your teeth? Just when you thought you heard it all when it comes to coconut oil, along comes the news that coconut oil pulling can serve as a natural teeth whitener. Some people attest to their teeth becoming whiter and overall healthier by applying coconut oil to their teeth after they brush, and most people praise the results of oil pulling.
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