Activated charcoal, even though it is black, can actually help whiten teeth naturally. It seems counterintuitive, but charcoal is known for its ability to pull toxins out of things. Stains on your teeth are no different. Dip your toothbrush into activated charcoal powder, brush on your teeth, and leave for a few minutes. Rinse well and follow with your regular toothpaste. (Find activated charcoal powder here.)

I think you are right on with your thinking here. Incidentally, on the Mohr’s scale of hardness (where diamonds are 10), ironically activated charcoal is only around 2. However, your point about RDA for charcoal is another subject all together. I don’t know the RDA for activated charcoal by itself, but my guess is it’s pretty high. My reasoning for this guess is a company who makes a tooth powder that uses activated charcoal as one of it’s ingredients states that the RDA for their product is 117. Yikes! Sure, it’s lower than some ‘whitening’ commercial pastes on the market, but that’s not a very high standard to judge one’s product safety.

Xylitol from birch is the best. Shelly, the role of xylitol in reversing tooth decay is that it helps correct the ph in your mouth. This is most important for anyone who has any metal fillings, retainers or other dental work. I’ve healed a cavity naturally by using xylitol as a part of my oral health routine. It is not a cure all, and xylitol from corn is not the same as xylitol from birch bark. With any metal work in your mouth, you are almost ensuring you will need more dental work, unless you work very hard to keep the ph of your mouth correct.


Is it crucial to oil pull for the full 15-20 minutes and EVERY day or would every other or less time daily be effective??? I have a hard time seeing how to add 20 minutes to my day, so I have yet to give this one a try. I did try the turmeric and the charcoal on my teeth (at different times) but found not much improvement, but a large mess! Thanks for your info!
With each decade that we age, our teeth can get up to one to two shades darker. The color pigments inside teeth become more prominent as the dentin structure below the enamel grows. Consider the enamel to be like translucent glass, with the dentin structure shining through underneath, giving us our tooth color. Genetics play a large role in the darkening of our teeth extrinsically and intrinsically, but environmental factors, oral hygiene, and nutrition also contribute to the shade of our teeth.

Dr. Hulda Clarke has told us that oil dissolves metal. That would be the concern for me with holding oil in contact with amalgam fillings for extended periods of time, rather than supposing the oil creates a mercury vapour. I would be concerned at the potential amount of dissolved metals which might be absorbed by the oral mucosa during oil pulling, day after day. Until there is a study conducted on this matter or until my amalgam restorations are removed, I would rather follow a precautionary principle and avoid the oil pulling. – Maggie

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.


Teeth whitening strips may be more appropriate for the person who has more yellow teeth. These are plastic strips coated on one side with hydrogen peroxide. They can be used nightly for two to four weeks depending upon the degree to which you want to produce a lighter shade. They still are not as effective as dental whitening, but they can create lighter teeth. Most four-week kits cost between 20-40 USD. The strips don’t necessarily adhere completely to the teeth, and there may be more whitening in front than in the back of each tooth.
Not only is it bad for your health, smoking is one of the worst offenders when it comes to staining teeth. Tobacco causes brown stains that penetrate the grooves and pits of tooth enamel. Tobacco stains can be hard to remove by brushing alone. The longer you smoke, the more entrenched the stains become. Smoking also causes bad breath and gingivitis (gum disease), and increases the risk of most types of cancer.
Teeth bleaching products should only be used under the guidance of your dentist. Remember that whitening treatments may work temporarily but likely not for long. The best way to whiten your teeth is by feeding your body lots of healthy foods (these are also important for strong bones), brushing and rinsing your teeth and gums every day, plus working on omitting coffee, tea and sugary foods in your diet. The very first step you should take: If you smoke, stop smoking! And of course, no matter what your age, show your teeth some love by brushing with a natural, non-irritating toothpaste every day.

The enamel and dentin is what play the biggest role in color. Certain food and drinks will directly stain the enamel, yes, but over time the two biggest culprits are the nasty food and drink that actually break down the enamel, and weakening enamel as we age. As the enamel breaks down, it reveals the yellow dentin underneath. These remedies will focus on whitening teeth that have already lost some white enamel, but it’s also good to keep in mind that doing things to strengthen enamel is just as important so you can keep it from breaking down further. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure (or whitening!)


Lori Ryman, BS, MS, has been dedicated to researching natural alternatives for the past 15 years. Lori has a background in research methods, health, and nutrition. She started with an Interest in natural alternatives to improve her own health and she continues to share natural DIY projects, recipes and natural alternatives with millions of viewers on healthextremist.com.
It makes sense that apple cider vinegar (ACV), which effectively works as a natural antibiotic and teeth/gum cleanser, would also be able to remove stubborn stains on the teeth. ACV is especially helpful for removing stains due to common culprits like coffee and nicotine (smoking). Some report that after using ACV it looks like you just got your teeth professionally cleaned!
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