Pick the right toothbrush. Both manual and electric powered toothbrushes can effectively clean teeth.[5] People who have difficulty using a manual toothbrush may find powered toothbrushes easier to use but you will still need to learn how to use it properly to avoid gum recession over time. Your dentist can help you decide which type is best suited to your needs.
Good oral hygiene is a tried-and-true method for keeping your smile looking its best. Toothpastes gently buff out stains from the surface of your teeth. Whitening toothpastes work the same way with more ingredients; they don't bleach your teeth. Flossing gets rid of food and bacteria that could harden into plaque, which makes your teeth look dull and darker.
Perhaps the intensity of the heat in the professional whitening lights is the culprit? Or maybe your sensitivity and irritation is caused by the caustic breakdown of the carbamide peroxide formula used in tray and gel whitening methods? No matter what the source of the discomfort is, here are some facts to help guide you in making the right choice when it comes to your preferred method of whitening:
As we age, the outer layer of tooth enamel wears away. The underlying layer, called dentin, is yellower. That's why it's important to try to avoid staining teeth in the first place, especially after whitening. If you take care with foods and drinks that discolor teeth, the results of whitening may last up to one year. Whitening teeth too often could make them look translucent and blue, so you'll want to maintain your new smile.
The antibiotic tetracycline causes gray teeth in children whose teeth are still developing. Antibacterial mouthwashes that contain chlorhexidine or cetylpyridinium chloride can also stain teeth. Some antihistamines, antipsychotic drugs, and blood pressure medications cause tooth stains, as can iron and excess fluoride. If bleaching doesn't help, ask your dentist about dental bonding, in which a tooth-colored material is applied to teeth.
One thing to be aware of when it comes to whitening teeth is that certain natural whiteners can eradicate enamel. Some teeth whiteners are just not a good idea to use, especially lemon juice. While the lemon peel is actually a good, healthy way to whiten teeth, the juice itself is simply too strong. The acid in the actual lemon juice does great for bleaching clothes, hair and getting stains out of furniture, but you wouldn’t want to put lemon juice on your teeth as a mouth gum cleaner every single day. Eventually, the acid creates tiny holes in your teeth, and then every kind of staining type food will seep into these tiny holes and remain there. The acid from the lemons is so strong it just eventually wears away the teeth, causing cavities.
And I have a wish. Maybe it is possible, that you write about energy?How to get more, what you can do to keep it high. Although I eat clean and healthy my energy is very low and nothing really seems to help. I try to get out every day, but can’t make ist . I have ‘only’ one child and it is hard for me to get through the days and wonder how you manage everything so well. Maybe you have some ideas. Would be very much appreciated. Thx.
With each decade that we age, our teeth can get up to one to two shades darker. The color pigments inside teeth become more prominent as the dentin structure below the enamel grows. Consider the enamel to be like translucent glass, with the dentin structure shining through underneath, giving us our tooth color. Genetics play a large role in the darkening of our teeth extrinsically and intrinsically, but environmental factors, oral hygiene, and nutrition also contribute to the shade of our teeth.
Are these remedies going to guarantee ridiculously white teeth within a week? No. You may start to see a difference, but it won’t be as instant as the commercial products. In the end, will your teeth be so white people squint when you open your mouth? No. And I like it better that way. I’ve found that since using these my teeth are indeed whiter, my mouth overall feels healthier and it doesn’t look like I bleached the life out of myself. We live in a world where photo-shopped faces (and teeth) and make-up covered celebrities set the standard for how we look, which makes life hard for people who like, well, real people. As a result we seem to forget what’s good for ourselves, and spend a ton of money just to look like the ideal. By going natural here, you can save the money for something else, feel better about yourself, and have a healthier mouth (and health is what, in the end, creates real beauty.)

This really is the best kept secret of how to whiten teeth naturally fast at home. Coconut oil was used as a toothpaste in India. Coconut oil contains lauric acid, which combats the bacteria responsible for teeth yellowing, while also keeping the breath fresh. You can use it as often as you like, as coconut oil does not bleach, it gets rid of the bacteria responsible for yellow teeth. It is an amazing home remedy for teeth whitening for sensitive teeth. It also tastes good, and is cheap. Here is how to whiten teeth with coconut oil:
Pick the right toothbrush. Both manual and electric powered toothbrushes can effectively clean teeth.[5] People who have difficulty using a manual toothbrush may find powered toothbrushes easier to use but you will still need to learn how to use it properly to avoid gum recession over time. Your dentist can help you decide which type is best suited to your needs.
It's the bleaching agent found in most home whitening kits. It actually changes a tooth's color. One study found that painting an over-the-counter gel with 6% hydrogen peroxide on teeth made a noticeable difference after 2 weeks. The inexpensive bottles of liquid you can buy in a drugstore usually have a lower percentage. And the American Dental Association says swishing will probably irritate your gums before it whitens your teeth.
Debra is a master gardener, a certified herbalist, a natural living instructor and more. She taught Matt and Betsy how to make soap so they decided to bring her on as a staff writer! Debra recently started an organic herb farm in the mountains of Western North Carolina. You can even purchase her handmade products on Amazon! Connect with Debra Maslowski on G+.
I simply dip my toothbrush into some powdered charcoal that I keep in a small jar on my counter and brush as normal. Another way that will produce results more quickly is to mix a teaspoon of charcoal powder into some water and swish with it for a few minutes. Then, spit the water and leave the remaining charcoal in the mouth for a few minutes so that it has time to bind to stains.
Give hydrogen peroxide a try. Many commercial mouthwashes and toothpastes have a 1.5% concentration of hydrogen peroxide, a powerful bleaching agent with a chemical composition that is incredibly close to water. This can help whiten your teeth.[20][21] Hydrogen peroxide also helps kill bacteria, wash away debris and is especially useful to prevent gingivitis.

Make a solution of 1 part ACV and 2 parts water. Swish this around in your mouth for 2-3 minutes, then spit it out. Rinse and brush as usual. ACV has strong fruit acids which can help whiten teeth, but only use this once a week. If you make your own apple cider vinegar, you may want to dilute it even more, like 1:10, since homemade ACV is usually very strong.

6. Oil Pulling: Oil pulling is an Ayurvedic technique which has been used to benefit oral health, prevent and treat cavities, reduce plaque, improve gums and even whiten teeth. Oil pulling is when you swish a spoonful of quality oil in your mouth for up to 15 minutes. Then rinse your mouth. Sesame oil or coconut oil can be used, just to name a few.
Whiter teeth, like thick, shiny, hair, is something that many people in our cosmetically driven world desire today. In fact, Americans spend over $1.4 billion dollars in over-the-counter teeth whitening products every year-that’s a good chunk of money just to achieve a different shade of teeth. I’ll be the first to admit that I’ve tried OTC teeth whitener-I even paid to have my dentist do it once. It worked for a bit, but my teeth got so sensitive I couldn’t stand it. I also felt I really didn’t need to be so obsessed with the color of my teeth that I paid a bunch of money for a bunch of who-knows-what that made my teeth hurt, so I started looking into more natural alternatives. With a bit of patience, I think you can naturally restore whiteness to your teeth. They may not get to be scary sear-out-somebodies-corneas –when-you –smile white, but they’ll appear more like you took good care of your pretty pearly whites rather than just bleaching them like crazy.
The disadvantage of brush on formulas to whiten your teeth is that you are instructed to keep you teeth completely dry for about a minute after you apply the formula. The mouth works against this because it constantly produces saliva, especially right after you have brushed your teeth. This can lead to undesirable results, when areas of the teeth you have treated are touched by saliva; in other words, you can get white spots on the teeth. On the plus side, careful application of brush on formula means minimal amounts get on the gums, so irritated gums are unlikely.
Limit your intake of fruits that contain citric acid, such as oranges, lemons, berries and tomatoes. Too much citric acid can cause enamel erosion.[27] However, don’t completely avoid these fruits unless you have a digestive condition or allergy. These fruits contain many nutrients that are essential for bodily functions and contribute to creating a strong immune system.
The baking soda and lemon juice works but it is best done by mixing fresh on a daily basis and not by storing since the acid in the lemon and most of the other properties of the lemon mixed with the baking soda effect the way the paste performs. Try it for a week then give it a break though since you don’t want to damage the enamel of your teeth. It definitely made my white!

I’ve struggled with staining/yellowish teeth for quite some time due to my “rough” enamel (which my hygienist diagnosed, explaining that it tends to grab onto stains). A good cleaning at the dentist’s would always restore my teeth to their normal whiteness but the yellowing would return quickly and no amount of activated charcoal, oil pulling or baking soda would help. I decided to try baking soda brushing followed by coconut oil pulling twice daily after my most recent cleaning, which was just before this past Christmas. And I’m thrilled to report that my regimen is working! My teeth still feel very clean and look shiny and white (in a normal way, not blindingly white of course). I used whitening strips in my 20s to achieve this but they made my teeth horribly sensitive. I’m so happy to have found a solution to this frustrating and embarrassing issue! I simply brush with a pinch of baking soda, concentrating on my front teeth, and then rinse and swish with coconut oil for 10-15 min, morning and night. It really works. 🙂

As we age, the outer layer of tooth enamel wears away. The underlying layer, called dentin, is yellower. That's why it's important to try to avoid staining teeth in the first place, especially after whitening. If you take care with foods and drinks that discolor teeth, the results of whitening may last up to one year. Whitening teeth too often could make them look translucent and blue, so you'll want to maintain your new smile.

Debra is a master gardener, a certified herbalist, a natural living instructor and more. She taught Matt and Betsy how to make soap so they decided to bring her on as a staff writer! Debra recently started an organic herb farm in the mountains of Western North Carolina. You can even purchase her handmade products on Amazon! Connect with Debra Maslowski on G+.
Activated charcoal, even though it is black, can actually help whiten teeth naturally. It seems counterintuitive, but charcoal is known for its ability to pull toxins out of things. Stains on your teeth are no different. Dip your toothbrush into activated charcoal powder, brush on your teeth, and leave for a few minutes. Rinse well and follow with your regular toothpaste. (Find activated charcoal powder here.)

Now that you are armed with these facts, let’s take a look at the various whitening options available in the market today. Professional whitening procedures provide the most efficacious results, especially when followed up by an at-home regimen to stabilize the whitening (think, high frequency, low intensity). For those who don’t have the extra money to spend on professional treatments, let’s take a look at the four categories currently available in over-the-counter today and which one to use based on how much time you have to commit to a whitening regimen. 
To figure out how to whiten our teeth, we have to know why they get yellow in the first place. There are several factors that play a part, including genetics, what kind of food and drink you consume, and how well you practice oral hygiene. A tooth is made up of 4 tissues-enamel, which is the strong white covering that protects the tooth, dentin, which supports the enamel and is a hard yellow material that carries nerves, pulp, which is at the center of the tooth and contains blood and lymph vessels, and cementum, which covers the root of the tooth.
Thanks for the supportive words. It’s fine to oil pull with amalgam fillings. It’s important to grasp that amalgam fillings off gas 24/7. They give off more mercury vapor when stimulated. Most common ‘stimulants’ are hot drinks, brushing, dental cleanings, and chewing. I really don’t think that oil pulling would increase the risk of mercury vapor. And even if it did, my guess is the oil would tie it up and you spit out the mercury with the oil.

I recently saw some beautiful wedding pictures where the bride had bright white teeth. I asked if she had them professionally whitened and the mother of the bride said that she used coconut oil. I was thrilled because i had purchased some coconut oil from the Organic Marketplace in our town and plan to use it for better dental care and oral health.
Underneath the enamel is a pale brown substance called dentin, which can become more visible when enamel gets thinner — a very common occurrence for many adults. (2) Dental erosion (erosive tooth wear) results from chronic loss of dental hard tissue that is chemically etched away from the tooth surface by acid and/or chelation (without bacterial involvement). (3) What are some of the reasons enamel thins? Risk factors include aging, genetics and intake of foods that promote erosion and/or staining. Many of these same unhealthy habits also increase your risk for gum disease.
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