Teeth bleaching products should only be used under the guidance of your dentist. Remember that whitening treatments may work temporarily but likely not for long. The best way to whiten your teeth is by feeding your body lots of healthy foods (these are also important for strong bones), brushing and rinsing your teeth and gums every day, plus working on omitting coffee, tea and sugary foods in your diet. The very first step you should take: If you smoke, stop smoking! And of course, no matter what your age, show your teeth some love by brushing with a natural, non-irritating toothpaste every day.

Can it be true? Coconut oil to clean your teeth? Just when you thought you heard it all when it comes to coconut oil, along comes the news that coconut oil pulling can serve as a natural teeth whitener. Some people attest to their teeth becoming whiter and overall healthier by applying coconut oil to their teeth after they brush, and most people praise the results of oil pulling.


In today’s article on how to naturally whiten your teeth without destroying your enamel, we will detail several strategies that we have researched and deem to be safe for long-term use.  We will also provide some ‘supercharged’ strategies to provide extra whitening support without the potential risks associated with conventional whitening (bleaching) treatments.
Is it crucial to oil pull for the full 15-20 minutes and EVERY day or would every other or less time daily be effective??? I have a hard time seeing how to add 20 minutes to my day, so I have yet to give this one a try. I did try the turmeric and the charcoal on my teeth (at different times) but found not much improvement, but a large mess! Thanks for your info!
Once I became pregnant with our first child, I was careful to avoid all chemicals, including those normally used to whiten teeth. I wanted to find natural ways to whiten my teeth that not only worked well, but were also safe. Since chemicals can easily absorb through the sensitive skin in the mouth, I wanted to only use options that were safe enough to eat.
Terri, it really is 10 to 15 minutes. During that time, your mouth will get fuller and fuller as more of your natural saliva is generated and added to the oil already in your mouth – by the end of the oil pulling session, you will have twice as much in your mouth as the tablespoon you start with, and this can be hard at first. I had to work up to that tablespoon to be able to keep it in my mouth for 10 minutes; I started with about a half tablespoon.
I think that using baking soda is a time honored classic. I have heard all growing up that it would be a good alternative to toothpaste and could help keep them whiter. So, I do brush with it every now and then, I just hate the taste. I will have to try some of your other suggestions though. The most intriguing being the use of clay powder. Thanks.
Choose the right floss. Flossing is one the most important steps in your dental care routine besides brushing.[8] Commercial floss is made from synthetic nylon or plastic filaments. It is often treated with flavoring agents, such as mint or lemon, artificial sweeteners and sugar alcohols, such as xylitol and mannitol, to make flossing more pleasant. They may also be waxed with beeswax or plant-based wax for ease of use. Keep in mind, however, that there is no difference in the effectiveness of waxed or unwaxed floss.
Make a paste of baking soda and lemon juice. It will likely fizz and foam a bit. Wait for it to settle down and use this solution to brush your teeth. Rinse well. You don’t need to follow with your regular toothpaste, but you can if you wish. Lemon juice contains citric acid, so it can damage your teeth if used too often. Only do this once a week for best results.
I cannot speak from personal experience or make gurantees, but from what I understand it is *generally* considered safe IF the cap is properly placed. I do not see how coconut oil would loosen up a well placed cap, but you’ll still find some people that feel it’s caused a problem for them. Fillings also have somewhat of a shelf life-that is, they won’t last for your lifetime. If you’ve had a filling for awhile (say, ten years) it could be hiding decay or loose or chipped and need to be replaced anyways.
Floss your teeth regularly. Flossing at least once a day helps remove plaque from the areas between your teeth where your toothbrush can’t reach as plaque that is not removed eventually hardens into tartar and can lead to gum disease.[9] Keep in mind that flossing may cause some discomfort at first but should not be painful either. If you floss too hard, you can damage the tissue between your teeth. With daily flossing and brushing, the discomfort should ease within a week or two. It may take a while to get used to flossing but it should slowly turn into a habit. If your pain persists, talk to your dentist. The proper steps to flossing your teeth are:

I grew up using Crest with fluoride, brushing within 5 minutes after finishing a meal… (I’ve only ever had three cavities, one of which the dentist gave me when he jabbed his pick into a molar.) After about 30-35 years my teeth began to get really sensitive, so I switched to the various sensitive toothpastes, again with fluoride. About two years ago (I’m almost 59 now), I began reading about fluoride’s effects on teeth and the body, including how FLUORIDE STAINS TEETH YELLOW/BROWN. So I switched to Tom’s no-fluoride toothpaste. I don’t know if it’s just wishful thinking, or an actuality, but I believe my teeth are getting whiter – and I still drink a quart of hot regular black tea (4 teabags’ worth in a Mason jar) every morning! There’s natural fluoride in the tea, but cutting out the fluoride toothpaste has made a world of difference AND my teeth aren’t sensitive anymore, either! I think the sensitivity was also brought on by all that fluoride! Any time I tried to switch off the sensitive pastes to a regular toothpaste, or even between brands of the sensitive types, the inner lining of my mouth would slough off in sheets (as in peeling skin after a bad sunburn), my teeth would just throb, and I’d go back to the sensitive paste. When I went to the Tom’s, my mouth lining was fine, my teeth never hurt, and they seem to be getting whiter! HOORAY!!!
Research has shown that teeth-whitening products can damage the teeth by removing too much enamel. Conventional whitening strips, and other whitening products, contain a gel with the active ingredient carbamide peroxide, which breaks down into hydrogen peroxide and a waste product called urea. Constant application of whitening strips has been shown to cause erosion of enamel over time and also promote tooth sensitivity, especially when eating hot and cold liquids or acidic foods.
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