Get more exposure to sunlight. Your body naturally makes vitamin D when exposed to sunlight. People with light skin should try to get at least 10 to 15 minutes of sunlight, while people with dark skin should get at least 30 minutes of sunlight exposure daily. Clouds, smog, clothing, sunscreen and window glass all reduce the amount of sunlight that actually reaches the skin.
I have deep sockets and my dentist told me every 3 months I need to rinse with peroxide to get food out so my gums wouldn’t hurt. I started doing this and at my next visit my dentist asked me what I was using to whiten my teeth and I told her nothing because I didn’t think I was. After my next 6 month visit I told her what I was doing as far as using the peroxide as she told me to and she said thats why your teeth are so white. So Proxide whiten your teeth.
I simply dip my toothbrush into some powdered charcoal that I keep in a small jar on my counter and brush as normal. Another way that will produce results more quickly is to mix a teaspoon of charcoal powder into some water and swish with it for a few minutes. Then, spit the water and leave the remaining charcoal in the mouth for a few minutes so that it has time to bind to stains.
You can also try a few home remedies to whiten your teeth, though not all dentists recommend them. Brushing the teeth with baking soda can produce slightly lighter shades. You can also brush with no greater than 10% strength hydrogen peroxide. For drug store methods, gel kits are thought most effective, and brush on teeth whitener the least. However, with minimal tooth yellowing, over the counter remedies are less expensive than dental whitening, and may provide you with the lighter shade you desire.
You may be able to get rid of superficial stains by yourself. A number of at-home tooth-whitening products -- kits, strips, toothpastes, and rinses-- may lighten stains. There are even some old-fashioned remedies you can try. Tooth-whitening products available on drugstore shelves use mild bleach to brighten yellow teeth. Toothpastes use abrasives and chemicals to remove surface stains. For deep stains, you may need a dentist's help.
Teeth whitening strips may be more appropriate for the person who has more yellow teeth. These are plastic strips coated on one side with hydrogen peroxide. They can be used nightly for two to four weeks depending upon the degree to which you want to produce a lighter shade. They still are not as effective as dental whitening, but they can create lighter teeth. Most four-week kits cost between 20-40 USD. The strips don’t necessarily adhere completely to the teeth, and there may be more whitening in front than in the back of each tooth.
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However, lemon juice is acidic. If we were in your shoes, we would not use lemon juice for brushing our teeth, because the acidity may weaken your enamel and increase your chances of damaging it as you brush. We explain more on acidity in our articles “How to Drink Kombucha and NOT Destroy Your Teeth“, “Can Brushing After a Meal Damage My Teeth?“, and “Tracking Your Saliva pH“.
Over-the-counter tray and gels have been around the longest. Known as a “boil and bite” system, they require you to heat a tray, fill it with gel, and place the formed tray in your mouth. This whitening method takes weeks to deliver results, and 80 percent of users report sensitivity due to the breakdown of the carbamide peroxide gel. While the tray helps prevent oxygen from escaping, there are other options that can lead to efficacious whitening without the soft tissue irritation and pain. 
Great questions! Oil pulling is an ancient cleansing and detoxifying technique from Ayurvedic medicine, the traditional medicine of India. The process is simply to vigorously swish (also known as “pull”) unrefined oils (usually coconut or sesame oil) throughout the mouth for several minutes. Similar to what oil does in a car engine, oil pulling gathers all sorts of debris like bacteria, fungi, and viruses (aka bad bugs) into the oil to be spit out. Some people also like to do oil pulling to help remove stains so that their teeth appear whiter.
You may be able to get rid of superficial stains by yourself. A number of at-home tooth-whitening products -- kits, strips, toothpastes, and rinses-- may lighten stains. There are even some old-fashioned remedies you can try. Tooth-whitening products available on drugstore shelves use mild bleach to brighten yellow teeth. Toothpastes use abrasives and chemicals to remove surface stains. For deep stains, you may need a dentist's help.
With each decade that we age, our teeth can get up to one to two shades darker. The color pigments inside teeth become more prominent as the dentin structure below the enamel grows. Consider the enamel to be like translucent glass, with the dentin structure shining through underneath, giving us our tooth color. Genetics play a large role in the darkening of our teeth extrinsically and intrinsically, but environmental factors, oral hygiene, and nutrition also contribute to the shade of our teeth.
An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. Foods including dark berries and drinks such as coffee, red wine, and soda are known offenders, but you don't have to give them up. Enjoy these in moderation, and rinse with water right afterward so there's less chance they'll affect your teeth. (Wait 30 minutes before brushing to protect the enamel.)
The enamel and dentin is what play the biggest role in color. Certain food and drinks will directly stain the enamel, yes, but over time the two biggest culprits are the nasty food and drink that actually break down the enamel, and weakening enamel as we age. As the enamel breaks down, it reveals the yellow dentin underneath. These remedies will focus on whitening teeth that have already lost some white enamel, but it’s also good to keep in mind that doing things to strengthen enamel is just as important so you can keep it from breaking down further. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure (or whitening!)
Fluoride is a naturally occurring mineral found in water. Toothpastes with fluoride help prevent tooth decay by strengthening your tooth enamel and fighting away bacteria that cause cavities. Fluoride toothpaste is also recommended for toddlers and children but in a lower percentage. Too much fluoride can weaken the enamel. For children younger than three years, an amount equal to a grain of rice is enough. For children aged three to six years, use a pea-sized amount of fluoride toothpaste.
Avoiding smoking cigarettes, drinking too much coffee and/or soda, improving your oral hygiene overall, and eating a healthy diet can all also help prevent yellow teeth. If you do regularly drink staining beverages, do so through a straw and try to cut back. Try to drink more plain water after eating or drinking something staining or acidic to help reduce the negative effects.
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