If the “silver” is actually amalgam, which is usually what silver or metal fillings are, it is actually mercury mixed with several other metals. The benefit for dentists is that it can be placed securely over moist surfaces, such as your teeth. There is some debate as to whether or not the oil reacts with the amalgam and produces some sort of toxicity as it is “pulling” the mercury’s toxins out-but from my knowledge and research, many people report oil pulling with amalgam and do just fine, and I have yet to find a solid report on any “poisoning.” If you’re concerned you can always ring the dentist, but I suspect you’d be fine 😉

I think that using baking soda is a time honored classic. I have heard all growing up that it would be a good alternative to toothpaste and could help keep them whiter. So, I do brush with it every now and then, I just hate the taste. I will have to try some of your other suggestions though. The most intriguing being the use of clay powder. Thanks.
i usually go to the dentist to whiten my teeth, every 2 months. But does anyone know if these great ideas actually work? because that would be so wonderful if they do. i was reading this other article the other day and it said for the lemon and baking soda to not keep it on for over 30 seconds. I was just wondering if anyone tried them and had some feedback.
I think you are right on with your thinking here. Incidentally, on the Mohr’s scale of hardness (where diamonds are 10), ironically activated charcoal is only around 2. However, your point about RDA for charcoal is another subject all together. I don’t know the RDA for activated charcoal by itself, but my guess is it’s pretty high. My reasoning for this guess is a company who makes a tooth powder that uses activated charcoal as one of it’s ingredients states that the RDA for their product is 117. Yikes! Sure, it’s lower than some ‘whitening’ commercial pastes on the market, but that’s not a very high standard to judge one’s product safety.
Xylitol from birch is the best. Shelly, the role of xylitol in reversing tooth decay is that it helps correct the ph in your mouth. This is most important for anyone who has any metal fillings, retainers or other dental work. I’ve healed a cavity naturally by using xylitol as a part of my oral health routine. It is not a cure all, and xylitol from corn is not the same as xylitol from birch bark. With any metal work in your mouth, you are almost ensuring you will need more dental work, unless you work very hard to keep the ph of your mouth correct.
Dietary supplements are also available at most pharmacies for people with low vitamin D. Children under 12 months of age need at least 400 IU of vitamin D. Children over 1 year and most adults need at least 600 IU, including pregnant and breastfeeding women. People above the age of 70 may need up to 800 IU of vitamin D. Ask your doctor before giving vitamin D supplements to an infant or child.

If you have only minimal staining, whitening toothpaste is clearly the easiest way to whiten your teeth at home. Brushing two to three times a day can whiten your teeth four to five shades after about a month of consistent use. Formulas for tooth whitening toothpaste are all about equivalent in effect, but kids under 16 should not use them. They can cause irritation to the gums and teeth of younger kids.
With each decade that we age, our teeth can get up to one to two shades darker. The color pigments inside teeth become more prominent as the dentin structure below the enamel grows. Consider the enamel to be like translucent glass, with the dentin structure shining through underneath, giving us our tooth color. Genetics play a large role in the darkening of our teeth extrinsically and intrinsically, but environmental factors, oral hygiene, and nutrition also contribute to the shade of our teeth.
To oil pull, simply put a spoonful of coconut oil in your mouth and swish it between your teeth for five to 20 minutes, or add a few drops to your toothbrush and brush it on. Another oral care option is to apply coconut oil to a corner of a clean washcloth and rub it on the teeth. A bonus regarding coconut pulling? Coconut oil has antimicrobial properties, so it’s great for protecting and cleaning your gums as well.
×