Further research I’ve done on this showed that activated charcoal can actually be helpful in changing the pH and health of the mouth, and as such is effective in avoiding cavities and killing the bad bacteria present in tooth decay and gingivitis. For this reason, I now suggest and use it as part of my remineralizing protocol for teeth, along with my remineralizing toothpaste.

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To figure out how to whiten our teeth, we have to know why they get yellow in the first place. There are several factors that play a part, including genetics, what kind of food and drink you consume, and how well you practice oral hygiene. A tooth is made up of 4 tissues-enamel, which is the strong white covering that protects the tooth, dentin, which supports the enamel and is a hard yellow material that carries nerves, pulp, which is at the center of the tooth and contains blood and lymph vessels, and cementum, which covers the root of the tooth.
I had to get some partial veneers near my molars because a former dentist pulled one too many teeth and there was an awkward space left after I got orthodontic work done. So, I won’t even go close to these teeth with activated charcoal. Using the charcoal on teeth without cosmetic work is fine and my personal results were quite noticeable after three uses.
However, lemon juice is acidic. If we were in your shoes, we would not use lemon juice for brushing our teeth, because the acidity may weaken your enamel and increase your chances of damaging it as you brush. We explain more on acidity in our articles “How to Drink Kombucha and NOT Destroy Your Teeth“, “Can Brushing After a Meal Damage My Teeth?“, and “Tracking Your Saliva pH“.
An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. Foods including dark berries and drinks such as coffee, red wine, and soda are known offenders, but you don't have to give them up. Enjoy these in moderation, and rinse with water right afterward so there's less chance they'll affect your teeth. (Wait 30 minutes before brushing to protect the enamel.)

One simple strategy can help maintain white teeth: brush. Brush at least twice daily. Even better, brush after every meal and snack. Brushing helps prevent stains and yellow teeth, especially at the gum line. Both electric and sonic toothbrushes may be superior to traditional toothbrushes in removing plaque and surface stains on teeth. Also, don't forget to floss and use an antiseptic mouthwash daily.
Get enough Vitamin D. Vitamin D helps your body absorb and use calcium. It is also beneficial for boosting your immune system to fight against bacteria, viruses and free radicals that can erode teeth. Getting enough vitamin D can help you maintain a healthy smile, strengthen bones and even help prevent various types of diseases and cancers. Here are some ways to make sure you get enough vitamin D:

Malic acid in apples boosts saliva to wash away acids. Toothpastes with bromelain, a compound in pineapple, help whiten teeth. But there's no evidence that eating these fruits will make your grin gleam. Skip the strawberries, too. A study in Operative Dentistry found that brushing with a mixture of them and baking soda had no whitening effects. Even worse, the citric acid in strawberries can break down enamel, the outer shell of your tooth.
Fluoride is a naturally occurring mineral found in water. Toothpastes with fluoride help prevent tooth decay by strengthening your tooth enamel and fighting away bacteria that cause cavities. Fluoride toothpaste is also recommended for toddlers and children but in a lower percentage. Too much fluoride can weaken the enamel. For children younger than three years, an amount equal to a grain of rice is enough. For children aged three to six years, use a pea-sized amount of fluoride toothpaste.
I was dealing with sore gums, loose teeth, discoloration and sensitive molars.  I thought my diet was healthy and that my oral care was good but my dental visits showed otherwise. I began incorporating your HealThy Mouth Blend every evening on my floss.  Since then, my gum pockets have gone from 3-4s down to normal, my sensitivity and loose teeth have disappeared, and my teeth feel polished and fresh!
Calcium supplements derived from oyster shells, dolomite, and bone meal are best avoided as they may contain lead, which can cause anemia, damage to the brain and kidneys, raise blood pressure and cause poisoning. Calculus (tartar) on your teeth may also increase while using these supplements, so visit your dentist for a cleaning whenever you feel the deposits on your lower front teeth.
Drink fluoride-rich water. Fluoridated drinking water helps wash away food debris and bacteria and increase saliva production, while the fluoride helps strengthen tooth enamel thus preventing tooth decay.[28][29][30] However you should test yourself before this, as fluoride in high concentrations can be poisonous. People with sensitive teeth especially benefit from drinking cool, fluoridated water, since it also reduces inflammation in the gums.
Thanks for the supportive words. It’s fine to oil pull with amalgam fillings. It’s important to grasp that amalgam fillings off gas 24/7. They give off more mercury vapor when stimulated. Most common ‘stimulants’ are hot drinks, brushing, dental cleanings, and chewing. I really don’t think that oil pulling would increase the risk of mercury vapor. And even if it did, my guess is the oil would tie it up and you spit out the mercury with the oil.
I called many American Companies like mountain rose herbs , redmond clay ,aztec clay and when I asked them about lead in their clay they said that every clay comes from the earth and that is why there is tiny amount lead in the clay, but it occurs naturally so it is bind with other elements in the clay and does not leak in the human body , so the human body can not absorb the naturally occuring lead in clay.
We are told that conventional teeth whitening (bleaching) is safe from experts.  Yet others warn of the risks of conventional teeth whitening.  Much of the confusion stems from the fact that the ‘facts’ around teeth whitening have been blurred intentionally.  Then we hear how Julia Roberts only uses baking soda to keep her smile bright.  But is baking soda even a safe option?
Dr. Hulda Clarke has told us that oil dissolves metal. That would be the concern for me with holding oil in contact with amalgam fillings for extended periods of time, rather than supposing the oil creates a mercury vapour. I would be concerned at the potential amount of dissolved metals which might be absorbed by the oral mucosa during oil pulling, day after day. Until there is a study conducted on this matter or until my amalgam restorations are removed, I would rather follow a precautionary principle and avoid the oil pulling. – Maggie
Great questions! Oil pulling is an ancient cleansing and detoxifying technique from Ayurvedic medicine, the traditional medicine of India. The process is simply to vigorously swish (also known as “pull”) unrefined oils (usually coconut or sesame oil) throughout the mouth for several minutes. Similar to what oil does in a car engine, oil pulling gathers all sorts of debris like bacteria, fungi, and viruses (aka bad bugs) into the oil to be spit out. Some people also like to do oil pulling to help remove stains so that their teeth appear whiter.
I’ve appreciated the information in your site. My gums have improved considerably from your help. One thing I’ve come across that helps considerably to remove stains from my teeth ( I drink black tea) is a paste of lemon juice and baking soda. I hesitated to use this at first because of the acid of the lemon but found that when mixed with the baking soda it is very alkaline. Putting the paste on your teeth without brushing helps. There were a few worse stains the went away with a light rub with my finger. I also found a gum surgical technique that is very non invasive for those who want to restore gum tissue quickly and permanently. Better gums right away and minimal pain. It’s called the pinhole surgical technique and the process is shown on YouTube if you do a search.
You may be able to get rid of superficial stains by yourself. A number of at-home tooth-whitening products -- kits, strips, toothpastes, and rinses-- may lighten stains. There are even some old-fashioned remedies you can try. Tooth-whitening products available on drugstore shelves use mild bleach to brighten yellow teeth. Toothpastes use abrasives and chemicals to remove surface stains. For deep stains, you may need a dentist's help.
Hold the floss tightly against the tooth. Gently rub the side of the tooth, moving the floss away from the gum with up and down motions. Repeat this method on the rest of your teeth. Don’t forget the back side of your last tooth. Once you’re finished, throw the floss away. A used piece of floss won’t be as effective and can reintroduce bacteria into your mouth.

Research has shown that teeth-whitening products can damage the teeth by removing too much enamel. Conventional whitening strips, and other whitening products, contain a gel with the active ingredient carbamide peroxide, which breaks down into hydrogen peroxide and a waste product called urea. Constant application of whitening strips has been shown to cause erosion of enamel over time and also promote tooth sensitivity, especially when eating hot and cold liquids or acidic foods.

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