I took tetracycline in the 70’s and ended up with a permanent yellowish color to my teeth. Lately I have been brushing my teeth with tooth gel (not toothpaste) and a dipping of the toothbrush in a little hydrogen peroxide at the same time. At first I thought nothing was happening, but after several weeks, I finally looked at my teeth and they were white! I was really surprised. Hopefully they will continue to become whiter. And, now I know you have to be patient!!! I plan to add baking soda, too. BTW, for some reason, toothpaste makes the inside of my mouth slough off, the same as another person mentioned above. So I have to brush with “tooth gel”, which is getting harder and harder to find.
First of all, one of the reasons why you are looking at how to whiten teeth naturally fast at home is probably because you already know that professional teeth whitening is nor cheap, neither is healthy. Professional teeth whitening can leave your teeth very sensitive and weak. So, since it is possible, you should try and whiten your teeth naturally at home.

Are these remedies going to guarantee ridiculously white teeth within a week? No. You may start to see a difference, but it won’t be as instant as the commercial products. In the end, will your teeth be so white people squint when you open your mouth? No. And I like it better that way. I’ve found that since using these my teeth are indeed whiter, my mouth overall feels healthier and it doesn’t look like I bleached the life out of myself. We live in a world where photo-shopped faces (and teeth) and make-up covered celebrities set the standard for how we look, which makes life hard for people who like, well, real people. As a result we seem to forget what’s good for ourselves, and spend a ton of money just to look like the ideal. By going natural here, you can save the money for something else, feel better about yourself, and have a healthier mouth (and health is what, in the end, creates real beauty.)


Make a solution of 1 part ACV and 2 parts water. Swish this around in your mouth for 2-3 minutes, then spit it out. Rinse and brush as usual. ACV has strong fruit acids which can help whiten teeth, but only use this once a week. If you make your own apple cider vinegar, you may want to dilute it even more, like 1:10, since homemade ACV is usually very strong.

If the “silver” is actually amalgam, which is usually what silver or metal fillings are, it is actually mercury mixed with several other metals. The benefit for dentists is that it can be placed securely over moist surfaces, such as your teeth. There is some debate as to whether or not the oil reacts with the amalgam and produces some sort of toxicity as it is “pulling” the mercury’s toxins out-but from my knowledge and research, many people report oil pulling with amalgam and do just fine, and I have yet to find a solid report on any “poisoning.” If you’re concerned you can always ring the dentist, but I suspect you’d be fine 😉
I think you are right on with your thinking here. Incidentally, on the Mohr’s scale of hardness (where diamonds are 10), ironically activated charcoal is only around 2. However, your point about RDA for charcoal is another subject all together. I don’t know the RDA for activated charcoal by itself, but my guess is it’s pretty high. My reasoning for this guess is a company who makes a tooth powder that uses activated charcoal as one of it’s ingredients states that the RDA for their product is 117. Yikes! Sure, it’s lower than some ‘whitening’ commercial pastes on the market, but that’s not a very high standard to judge one’s product safety.
I think you are right on with your thinking here. Incidentally, on the Mohr’s scale of hardness (where diamonds are 10), ironically activated charcoal is only around 2. However, your point about RDA for charcoal is another subject all together. I don’t know the RDA for activated charcoal by itself, but my guess is it’s pretty high. My reasoning for this guess is a company who makes a tooth powder that uses activated charcoal as one of it’s ingredients states that the RDA for their product is 117. Yikes! Sure, it’s lower than some ‘whitening’ commercial pastes on the market, but that’s not a very high standard to judge one’s product safety.
Whitening toothpastes usually contain mild abrasives that are typically mineral compounds such as magnesium carbonate, hydrated aluminum oxides and calcium carbonate. These help remove surface stains that cause yellowing and help you to achieve a brighter tooth surface. Whitening toothpastes also often contain a small percentage of hydrogen peroxide, a bleaching agent that helps remove stains.
A friend just told me about the “pulling” with Coconut Oil. She said it kills bacteria and whitens teeth. I have fairly white teeth, but I drink 3 cups of tea every morning, and I have places where I had tea stains. Didn’t want to use the expensive whiteners, and end up with the “fake” and almost “blue/white” looking teeth I see too much of. Bought a $5.99 jar of organic coconut oil at TJ Maxx yesterday. I spoon about 1/2 tablespoon into my hand, soften it up, then put the paste on my toothbrush. After one day and only 2 brushings, the tea stains are GONE. I’m sold !!!!!!!
Baking Soda isn’t a shocker here. Sodium bicarbonate (its official name) is mildly abrasive; gently scrubbing away surface stains to return teeth to a whiter shade. It’s also very alkaline (the opposite of acidic) so I would think if you have a very acidic mouth or eat a lot of acidic food, it could help balance out the Ph, which would be useful as acid breaks down enamel-this is strictly speculation on my part. It will also reduce the acidity of the lemon juice, which acts as a natural bleach of sorts. I use a mixture of baking soda and water on some days, and use the lemon juice on others, as I don’t want to overdo it.
Activated charcoal, even though it is black, can actually help whiten teeth naturally. It seems counterintuitive, but charcoal is known for its ability to pull toxins out of things. Stains on your teeth are no different. Dip your toothbrush into activated charcoal powder, brush on your teeth, and leave for a few minutes. Rinse well and follow with your regular toothpaste. (Find activated charcoal powder here.)
You can also try a few home remedies to whiten your teeth, though not all dentists recommend them. Brushing the teeth with baking soda can produce slightly lighter shades. You can also brush with no greater than 10% strength hydrogen peroxide. For drug store methods, gel kits are thought most effective, and brush on teeth whitener the least. However, with minimal tooth yellowing, over the counter remedies are less expensive than dental whitening, and may provide you with the lighter shade you desire.

Can it be true? Coconut oil to clean your teeth? Just when you thought you heard it all when it comes to coconut oil, along comes the news that coconut oil pulling can serve as a natural teeth whitener. Some people attest to their teeth becoming whiter and overall healthier by applying coconut oil to their teeth after they brush, and most people praise the results of oil pulling.
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