Eat more crunchy fruits and vegetables. A big part of keeping your teeth clean involves eating the right foods.[23][24][25][26] Naturally crunchy foods contain fiber, which helps increase saliva production in your mouth, removing many of the sugars and chemicals that can cause tooth decay. About 20 minutes after you eat something, your saliva begins to reduce the effects of the acids and enzymes attacking your teeth. Additionally, saliva contains traces of calcium and phosphate, which can also restore minerals to areas of teeth that have lost them from the bacterial acids.
At-home trays: If you get them from your dentist, she’ll make a mold of your teeth to create fitted trays. She’ll give you a strong bleaching gel to use at home. Over-the-counter systems work the same way. But they can cause irritation and may not work as well. Some OTC kits come with a bendable mouthpiece. These work better than one-size-fits-all trays. The bleaching gels that come in these kits aren’t as strong as the ones you get from a pro.
Whilst these remedies might be “natural” and might show results for “whiter” teeth, they are not healthy for the oral cavity. Although products such as baking soda have been used as home care adjuncts for decades, it can be destructive to both the teeth and gums. Baking soda is much too abrasive to use on the teeth. You might not see negative results after one use, but long-term use can cause abrasion and recession. Abrasion and recession can then lead to tooth sensitivity, cavities, and most importantly periodontal disease (which would render treatment more costly than professional whitening). Also-when whitening, you are not changing the color of the enamel. Whitening targets the dentin of the tooth not the enamel. However, I agree that it is important to use products to strengthen enamel. Products containing fluoride are great for strengthening the enamel.
Take calcium supplements. Calcium is essential to forming healthy teeth and bones. The two most popular forms of calcium supplements are calcium citrate and calcium carbonate. Taking vitamin D and magnesium supplements with calcium can help your body absorb and use the calcium more efficiently. Calcium supplements should be taken in very small doses, no more than 500 mg at any given time, in divided doses with six to eight cups of water to avoid constipation.

First, I’m sorry if the article was confusing on this aspect of it. With this part of the article on activated charcoal, we were simply expressing our personal concerns about the potential risks of daily use of activated charcoal. You see, warnings exist against using activated charcoal internally daily because it can inhibit absorption of vitamins and minerals. So, from our perspective, the same warning could be applied to regular use in the mouth.
The antibiotic tetracycline causes gray teeth in children whose teeth are still developing. Antibacterial mouthwashes that contain chlorhexidine or cetylpyridinium chloride can also stain teeth. Some antihistamines, antipsychotic drugs, and blood pressure medications cause tooth stains, as can iron and excess fluoride. If bleaching doesn't help, ask your dentist about dental bonding, in which a tooth-colored material is applied to teeth.
Vicky / Lisa. I am coming in a little late here but you should not experience any staining on veneers assuming they are porcelain. This is a glass like material and does not have the porous finish of tooth enamel (which also does not stain). I totally understand your reluctance though. Charcoal (activated only) can still absorb any form of discolouration and other bio-film from veneers.
Research has shown that teeth-whitening products can damage the teeth by removing too much enamel. Conventional whitening strips, and other whitening products, contain a gel with the active ingredient carbamide peroxide, which breaks down into hydrogen peroxide and a waste product called urea. Constant application of whitening strips has been shown to cause erosion of enamel over time and also promote tooth sensitivity, especially when eating hot and cold liquids or acidic foods.
Teeth bleaching products should only be used under the guidance of your dentist. Remember that whitening treatments may work temporarily but likely not for long. The best way to whiten your teeth is by feeding your body lots of healthy foods (these are also important for strong bones), brushing and rinsing your teeth and gums every day, plus working on omitting coffee, tea and sugary foods in your diet. The very first step you should take: If you smoke, stop smoking! And of course, no matter what your age, show your teeth some love by brushing with a natural, non-irritating toothpaste every day.
As oil pulling doesn’t involve any of these methods of increasing the stimulation of the amalgam, I see no reason to avoid oil pulling with amalgam fillings. To add to that, even if oil pulling stimulated the mercury to liberate, the fact is you are oil pulling to capture toxins and remove them from the body. Now, I realize that I’m assuming that oil in the mouth would help tie up any ‘extra’ mercury liberated and I don’t know if this is true. But it seems reasonable to me to think that IF more mercury is liberated from oil pulling that the oil/process itself would help bind the vapor and you’d spit it out.
Whilst these remedies might be “natural” and might show results for “whiter” teeth, they are not healthy for the oral cavity. Although products such as baking soda have been used as home care adjuncts for decades, it can be destructive to both the teeth and gums. Baking soda is much too abrasive to use on the teeth. You might not see negative results after one use, but long-term use can cause abrasion and recession. Abrasion and recession can then lead to tooth sensitivity, cavities, and most importantly periodontal disease (which would render treatment more costly than professional whitening). Also-when whitening, you are not changing the color of the enamel. Whitening targets the dentin of the tooth not the enamel. However, I agree that it is important to use products to strengthen enamel. Products containing fluoride are great for strengthening the enamel.
With each decade that we age, our teeth can get up to one to two shades darker. The color pigments inside teeth become more prominent as the dentin structure below the enamel grows. Consider the enamel to be like translucent glass, with the dentin structure shining through underneath, giving us our tooth color. Genetics play a large role in the darkening of our teeth extrinsically and intrinsically, but environmental factors, oral hygiene, and nutrition also contribute to the shade of our teeth.
There's another reason to watch what you eat. Some common foods can discolor teeth. Here's an easy way to tell if a food might be at fault: Anything that can stain a white cotton T-shirt can stain teeth, say dentists. Coffee stains teeth, for example. Other top offenders are beverages such as tea, dark sodas, and fruit juices. These teeth stains develop slowly and become more noticeable as we age.
If the “silver” is actually amalgam, which is usually what silver or metal fillings are, it is actually mercury mixed with several other metals. The benefit for dentists is that it can be placed securely over moist surfaces, such as your teeth. There is some debate as to whether or not the oil reacts with the amalgam and produces some sort of toxicity as it is “pulling” the mercury’s toxins out-but from my knowledge and research, many people report oil pulling with amalgam and do just fine, and I have yet to find a solid report on any “poisoning.” If you’re concerned you can always ring the dentist, but I suspect you’d be fine 😉
An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. Foods including dark berries and drinks such as coffee, red wine, and soda are known offenders, but you don't have to give them up. Enjoy these in moderation, and rinse with water right afterward so there's less chance they'll affect your teeth. (Wait 30 minutes before brushing to protect the enamel.)

The disadvantage of brush on formulas to whiten your teeth is that you are instructed to keep you teeth completely dry for about a minute after you apply the formula. The mouth works against this because it constantly produces saliva, especially right after you have brushed your teeth. This can lead to undesirable results, when areas of the teeth you have treated are touched by saliva; in other words, you can get white spots on the teeth. On the plus side, careful application of brush on formula means minimal amounts get on the gums, so irritated gums are unlikely.


Thanks for the supportive words. It’s fine to oil pull with amalgam fillings. It’s important to grasp that amalgam fillings off gas 24/7. They give off more mercury vapor when stimulated. Most common ‘stimulants’ are hot drinks, brushing, dental cleanings, and chewing. I really don’t think that oil pulling would increase the risk of mercury vapor. And even if it did, my guess is the oil would tie it up and you spit out the mercury with the oil.
Now that you are armed with these facts, let’s take a look at the various whitening options available in the market today. Professional whitening procedures provide the most efficacious results, especially when followed up by an at-home regimen to stabilize the whitening (think, high frequency, low intensity). For those who don’t have the extra money to spend on professional treatments, let’s take a look at the four categories currently available in over-the-counter today and which one to use based on how much time you have to commit to a whitening regimen. 
THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

I think you are right on with your thinking here. Incidentally, on the Mohr’s scale of hardness (where diamonds are 10), ironically activated charcoal is only around 2. However, your point about RDA for charcoal is another subject all together. I don’t know the RDA for activated charcoal by itself, but my guess is it’s pretty high. My reasoning for this guess is a company who makes a tooth powder that uses activated charcoal as one of it’s ingredients states that the RDA for their product is 117. Yikes! Sure, it’s lower than some ‘whitening’ commercial pastes on the market, but that’s not a very high standard to judge one’s product safety.
Activated charcoal, even though it is black, can actually help whiten teeth naturally. It seems counterintuitive, but charcoal is known for its ability to pull toxins out of things. Stains on your teeth are no different. Dip your toothbrush into activated charcoal powder, brush on your teeth, and leave for a few minutes. Rinse well and follow with your regular toothpaste. (Find activated charcoal powder here.)
Terri, it really is 10 to 15 minutes. During that time, your mouth will get fuller and fuller as more of your natural saliva is generated and added to the oil already in your mouth – by the end of the oil pulling session, you will have twice as much in your mouth as the tablespoon you start with, and this can be hard at first. I had to work up to that tablespoon to be able to keep it in my mouth for 10 minutes; I started with about a half tablespoon.
Dr. Hulda Clarke has told us that oil dissolves metal. That would be the concern for me with holding oil in contact with amalgam fillings for extended periods of time, rather than supposing the oil creates a mercury vapour. I would be concerned at the potential amount of dissolved metals which might be absorbed by the oral mucosa during oil pulling, day after day. Until there is a study conducted on this matter or until my amalgam restorations are removed, I would rather follow a precautionary principle and avoid the oil pulling. – Maggie

The reason why you might need to whiten your teeth is because certain foods and drinks stain our teeth. A tooth is made of 3 layers, the 2 most external ones, enamel and dentin, are the ones which are responsible for the teeth color. They naturally weaken as we age, but if we consume lots of junk food, they can turn yellow more quickly. So, when we talk about how to whiten teeth naturally fast at home, we talk about whitening the enamel and dentin. All of our home remedies to whiten teeth instantly will also work as preventive measures, together with a balanced diet and good teeth cleaning habits. Let's now come to how to whiten teeth naturally fast at home.
Activated charcoal, an absorbing product used to trap toxins inside the body, may help whiten your teeth by absorbing plaque and microscopic tidbits that cause staining. To whiten your teeth naturally with charcoal, wet a toothbrush and dip into powdered activated charcoal. Brush teeth as normal, paying special attention to areas showing the most staining. Sip a bit of water, swish through mouth thoroughly and spit. Rinse well, until spit is clear. For best results, brush your teeth with activated charcoal two to three times per week, but avoid using it if you have crowns, caps or porcelain veneers.
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