I took tetracycline in the 70’s and ended up with a permanent yellowish color to my teeth. Lately I have been brushing my teeth with tooth gel (not toothpaste) and a dipping of the toothbrush in a little hydrogen peroxide at the same time. At first I thought nothing was happening, but after several weeks, I finally looked at my teeth and they were white! I was really surprised. Hopefully they will continue to become whiter. And, now I know you have to be patient!!! I plan to add baking soda, too. BTW, for some reason, toothpaste makes the inside of my mouth slough off, the same as another person mentioned above. So I have to brush with “tooth gel”, which is getting harder and harder to find.
Do you want to whiten teeth fast, but you want to do it naturally and cheaply? There are some home remedies to whiten teeth instantly that might just be available in your kitchen, you only need to discover how to use them. If you thought that the only way to whiten teeth instantly is by going to the dentist and carrying out expensive procedures, you are wrong. We will teach you some home remedies to whiten teeth instantly that will not only whiten your teeth, they also won't damage them, and won't cost a fortune. So take note as on OneHowTo we explain how to whiten teeth naturally fast at home.

First, I’m sorry if the article was confusing on this aspect of it. With this part of the article on activated charcoal, we were simply expressing our personal concerns about the potential risks of daily use of activated charcoal. You see, warnings exist against using activated charcoal internally daily because it can inhibit absorption of vitamins and minerals. So, from our perspective, the same warning could be applied to regular use in the mouth.
At-home trays: If you get them from your dentist, she’ll make a mold of your teeth to create fitted trays. She’ll give you a strong bleaching gel to use at home. Over-the-counter systems work the same way. But they can cause irritation and may not work as well. Some OTC kits come with a bendable mouthpiece. These work better than one-size-fits-all trays. The bleaching gels that come in these kits aren’t as strong as the ones you get from a pro.

At-home trays: If you get them from your dentist, she’ll make a mold of your teeth to create fitted trays. She’ll give you a strong bleaching gel to use at home. Over-the-counter systems work the same way. But they can cause irritation and may not work as well. Some OTC kits come with a bendable mouthpiece. These work better than one-size-fits-all trays. The bleaching gels that come in these kits aren’t as strong as the ones you get from a pro.

I know this sounds absolutely mad (I thought it was crazy too when I first read about it) but rinsing your mouth with coconut oil (called ‘oil pulling’) is a unique, old, remedy that people swear by to help whiten teeth. It doesn’t sound like the most pleasant thing in the world, but I actually don’t mind the taste, and I think it does make a difference in the color of your teeth. It won’t make a difference by “bleaching” per say, but lauric acid in coconut oil can rid your teeth of bacteria found in plaque that can make them yellow. It is also supposed to promote gum health, and help keep your breath fresh.
Now that you are armed with these facts, let’s take a look at the various whitening options available in the market today. Professional whitening procedures provide the most efficacious results, especially when followed up by an at-home regimen to stabilize the whitening (think, high frequency, low intensity). For those who don’t have the extra money to spend on professional treatments, let’s take a look at the four categories currently available in over-the-counter today and which one to use based on how much time you have to commit to a whitening regimen. 
Pick the right toothbrush. Both manual and electric powered toothbrushes can effectively clean teeth.[5] People who have difficulty using a manual toothbrush may find powered toothbrushes easier to use but you will still need to learn how to use it properly to avoid gum recession over time. Your dentist can help you decide which type is best suited to your needs.

However, it might help to know that you can do lots of other activities while oil pulling. For example, I’m sitting here answering your questions on my computer and I could be oil pulling. Sometimes I oil pull while taking a shower. So, there’s no reason to not ‘double up’ and oil pull while doing other routine activities like surfing the net, watching a movie, reading, etc. In fact, sometimes I find that I oil pull for longer than 15-20 min because of the other activity.


You may be able to get rid of superficial stains by yourself. A number of at-home tooth-whitening products -- kits, strips, toothpastes, and rinses-- may lighten stains. There are even some old-fashioned remedies you can try. Tooth-whitening products available on drugstore shelves use mild bleach to brighten yellow teeth. Toothpastes use abrasives and chemicals to remove surface stains. For deep stains, you may need a dentist's help.
However, lemon juice is acidic. If we were in your shoes, we would not use lemon juice for brushing our teeth, because the acidity may weaken your enamel and increase your chances of damaging it as you brush. We explain more on acidity in our articles “How to Drink Kombucha and NOT Destroy Your Teeth“, “Can Brushing After a Meal Damage My Teeth?“, and “Tracking Your Saliva pH“.
Oral irrigators are electrical devices that pump water in a steady or pulsating stream to flush out food and debris in pockets between teeth, or in braces. They also are used to deliver medicine to hard-to-reach areas. For example, prescription rinses can be sprayed into gum pockets with an oral irrigator. You can also use an oral irrigator with a diluted mouthwash, which is helpful for those who have dental implants or bridges.
Hold the floss tightly against the tooth. Gently rub the side of the tooth, moving the floss away from the gum with up and down motions. Repeat this method on the rest of your teeth. Don’t forget the back side of your last tooth. Once you’re finished, throw the floss away. A used piece of floss won’t be as effective and can reintroduce bacteria into your mouth.
I think you are right on with your thinking here. Incidentally, on the Mohr’s scale of hardness (where diamonds are 10), ironically activated charcoal is only around 2. However, your point about RDA for charcoal is another subject all together. I don’t know the RDA for activated charcoal by itself, but my guess is it’s pretty high. My reasoning for this guess is a company who makes a tooth powder that uses activated charcoal as one of it’s ingredients states that the RDA for their product is 117. Yikes! Sure, it’s lower than some ‘whitening’ commercial pastes on the market, but that’s not a very high standard to judge one’s product safety.

Whilst these remedies might be “natural” and might show results for “whiter” teeth, they are not healthy for the oral cavity. Although products such as baking soda have been used as home care adjuncts for decades, it can be destructive to both the teeth and gums. Baking soda is much too abrasive to use on the teeth. You might not see negative results after one use, but long-term use can cause abrasion and recession. Abrasion and recession can then lead to tooth sensitivity, cavities, and most importantly periodontal disease (which would render treatment more costly than professional whitening). Also-when whitening, you are not changing the color of the enamel. Whitening targets the dentin of the tooth not the enamel. However, I agree that it is important to use products to strengthen enamel. Products containing fluoride are great for strengthening the enamel.
Do you happen to know the RDA / hardness of activated charcoal? It seems like it would be way too abrasive and hard to brush your teeth with. Perhaps the disparity of reports between users is that some are just swishing it around, while others are brushing it into their teeth, which, at that point, seems like it would not be the actual characteristics of the charcoal doing the whitening, as it would instead be the abrasive quality of it in general. (After all, diamonds are made of carbon too…)
The enamel and dentin is what play the biggest role in color. Certain food and drinks will directly stain the enamel, yes, but over time the two biggest culprits are the nasty food and drink that actually break down the enamel, and weakening enamel as we age. As the enamel breaks down, it reveals the yellow dentin underneath. These remedies will focus on whitening teeth that have already lost some white enamel, but it’s also good to keep in mind that doing things to strengthen enamel is just as important so you can keep it from breaking down further. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure (or whitening!)
Further research I’ve done on this showed that activated charcoal can actually be helpful in changing the pH and health of the mouth, and as such is effective in avoiding cavities and killing the bad bacteria present in tooth decay and gingivitis. For this reason, I now suggest and use it as part of my remineralizing protocol for teeth, along with my remineralizing toothpaste.
I have deep sockets and my dentist told me every 3 months I need to rinse with peroxide to get food out so my gums wouldn’t hurt. I started doing this and at my next visit my dentist asked me what I was using to whiten my teeth and I told her nothing because I didn’t think I was. After my next 6 month visit I told her what I was doing as far as using the peroxide as she told me to and she said thats why your teeth are so white. So Proxide whiten your teeth.

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Dietary supplements are also available at most pharmacies for people with low vitamin D. Children under 12 months of age need at least 400 IU of vitamin D. Children over 1 year and most adults need at least 600 IU, including pregnant and breastfeeding women. People above the age of 70 may need up to 800 IU of vitamin D. Ask your doctor before giving vitamin D supplements to an infant or child.
To figure out how to whiten our teeth, we have to know why they get yellow in the first place. There are several factors that play a part, including genetics, what kind of food and drink you consume, and how well you practice oral hygiene. A tooth is made up of 4 tissues-enamel, which is the strong white covering that protects the tooth, dentin, which supports the enamel and is a hard yellow material that carries nerves, pulp, which is at the center of the tooth and contains blood and lymph vessels, and cementum, which covers the root of the tooth.
Do you happen to know the RDA / hardness of activated charcoal? It seems like it would be way too abrasive and hard to brush your teeth with. Perhaps the disparity of reports between users is that some are just swishing it around, while others are brushing it into their teeth, which, at that point, seems like it would not be the actual characteristics of the charcoal doing the whitening, as it would instead be the abrasive quality of it in general. (After all, diamonds are made of carbon too…)
2. The second consideration on this subject is whether oil pulling is going to compromise any existing fillings (mercury or composite). This is another myth circulating on this subject. If a filling becomes compromised from oil pulling, then it was compromised already and the oil pulling simply helped it along its path to failure. In other words, oil pulling will not cause a properly placed filling to become weaker. However, if a filling is weak (and therefore should be changed as it’s not doing its job to restore the tooth), then we can see how oil pulling could further weaken the filling and increase its speed of failure. I consider this a benefit as the filling in question was already compromised and needs to be changed but we may have not been aware that it had already failed.
An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. Foods including dark berries and drinks such as coffee, red wine, and soda are known offenders, but you don't have to give them up. Enjoy these in moderation, and rinse with water right afterward so there's less chance they'll affect your teeth. (Wait 30 minutes before brushing to protect the enamel.)
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