Although there are many options  to whiten teeth, all of the kits you can purchase over the counter are loaded with harmful chemicals. The chemical tooth whiteners typically contain coal tars, aspartame, aluminum, floride and benzene.  The over the counter bleaches also have a very high acidity and are very abrasive which can cause damage to teeth, tooth pain and/or sensitivity, and damage the enamel. Not only are these chemicals harmful to your teeth and gums, the toxic chemicals often leak from the trays or strips and are swallowed or absorbed. As a result of the dangerous side effects and hazards with over the counter whitening, many are now opting to choose methods to naturally whiten teeth.
You may be able to get rid of superficial stains by yourself. A number of at-home tooth-whitening products -- kits, strips, toothpastes, and rinses-- may lighten stains. There are even some old-fashioned remedies you can try. Tooth-whitening products available on drugstore shelves use mild bleach to brighten yellow teeth. Toothpastes use abrasives and chemicals to remove surface stains. For deep stains, you may need a dentist's help.
One of the reasons we brush our teeth is to increase the saliva in our mouths to provide our teeth the necessary remineralization that occurs from contact with lots of saliva.  However, if we brush with activated charcoal on a daily basis, our concern is the charcoal’s binding ability will tie up the minerals necessary and inhibit this important remineralizing action of saliva.
One thing to be aware of when it comes to whitening teeth is that certain natural whiteners can eradicate enamel. Some teeth whiteners are just not a good idea to use, especially lemon juice. While the lemon peel is actually a good, healthy way to whiten teeth, the juice itself is simply too strong. The acid in the actual lemon juice does great for bleaching clothes, hair and getting stains out of furniture, but you wouldn’t want to put lemon juice on your teeth as a mouth gum cleaner every single day. Eventually, the acid creates tiny holes in your teeth, and then every kind of staining type food will seep into these tiny holes and remain there. The acid from the lemons is so strong it just eventually wears away the teeth, causing cavities.

Hello – I had been looking for this one! Thanks – I had been oil pulling with coconut oil for quite some time and I do think it helped whiten my teeth (although I did not have any before photos to compare – that is a good idea). But I quit after reading a warning that it would also be pulling from my silver fillings. Do you know the low down on that?
6. Oil Pulling: Oil pulling is an Ayurvedic technique which has been used to benefit oral health, prevent and treat cavities, reduce plaque, improve gums and even whiten teeth. Oil pulling is when you swish a spoonful of quality oil in your mouth for up to 15 minutes. Then rinse your mouth. Sesame oil or coconut oil can be used, just to name a few.
Choose the right floss. Flossing is one the most important steps in your dental care routine besides brushing.[8] Commercial floss is made from synthetic nylon or plastic filaments. It is often treated with flavoring agents, such as mint or lemon, artificial sweeteners and sugar alcohols, such as xylitol and mannitol, to make flossing more pleasant. They may also be waxed with beeswax or plant-based wax for ease of use. Keep in mind, however, that there is no difference in the effectiveness of waxed or unwaxed floss.
Eat calcium-rich foods. Calcium is essential to forming healthy teeth and bones.[33] Calcium is especially important for children who have just started forming new teeth and for older people who have weaker teeth and bones. The best way to get more calcium is through food. Cook foods in a small amount of water for the shortest possible time to keep more calcium in the foods you eat. The richest food sources of calcium include:
Strawberries are high in Vitamin C, which can help break-down plaque that is causing your teeth to look yellow. It also has an enzyme called malic acid, which may help to remove surface stains. The salt acts as an abrasive portion of the paste, physically scrubbing away stain-causing gunk, and the baking soda is an extra touch that you can choose to leave out if you’d prefer (I just like to add it to anything involving my teeth.)
Great questions! Oil pulling is an ancient cleansing and detoxifying technique from Ayurvedic medicine, the traditional medicine of India. The process is simply to vigorously swish (also known as “pull”) unrefined oils (usually coconut or sesame oil) throughout the mouth for several minutes. Similar to what oil does in a car engine, oil pulling gathers all sorts of debris like bacteria, fungi, and viruses (aka bad bugs) into the oil to be spit out. Some people also like to do oil pulling to help remove stains so that their teeth appear whiter.
One of the reasons we brush our teeth is to increase the saliva in our mouths to provide our teeth the necessary remineralization that occurs from contact with lots of saliva.  However, if we brush with activated charcoal on a daily basis, our concern is the charcoal’s binding ability will tie up the minerals necessary and inhibit this important remineralizing action of saliva.
In the morning, before you brush your teeth, scoop out a tablespoon or a little less (depending on the size of your mouth) of coconut oil. You can either soften it, or just put it in your mouth (I usually do the latter, and just let it soften.) Push, swish, and “pull” the oil through and around your teeth for 10-15 minutes, then spit it out, rinse with water, and brush your teeth.
However, it might help to know that you can do lots of other activities while oil pulling. For example, I’m sitting here answering your questions on my computer and I could be oil pulling. Sometimes I oil pull while taking a shower. So, there’s no reason to not ‘double up’ and oil pull while doing other routine activities like surfing the net, watching a movie, reading, etc. In fact, sometimes I find that I oil pull for longer than 15-20 min because of the other activity.
I know this sounds absolutely mad (I thought it was crazy too when I first read about it) but rinsing your mouth with coconut oil (called ‘oil pulling’) is a unique, old, remedy that people swear by to help whiten teeth. It doesn’t sound like the most pleasant thing in the world, but I actually don’t mind the taste, and I think it does make a difference in the color of your teeth. It won’t make a difference by “bleaching” per say, but lauric acid in coconut oil can rid your teeth of bacteria found in plaque that can make them yellow. It is also supposed to promote gum health, and help keep your breath fresh.
As one dentist reporting for the Dentistry IQ website puts it, “It is a misnomer that whiter teeth are the same as healthy teeth, since tooth color has very little to do with the health of the tooth. The consumer perception, though, is that white teeth equal a healthy mouth, and perception is reality.” (1) Here’s the good news: Below I explain several home remedies that help naturally whiten your teeth, while also improving overall oral hygiene. The kind of toothpaste you use plus regular brushing and flossing, using baking soda , coconut oil pulling, and tooth-healthy diet can all whiten your teeth naturally — in addition to offering benefits like antibacterial and antiseptic protection. You may also want to check out the Environmental Working Group’s Skin Deep Cosmetics Database recommendations for the best kinds of toothpaste for teeth whitening. 
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