One of the options on the market to whiten teeth instantly is whitening strips. However, those are expensive and they can damage your teeth because of their peroxide content. It is very fast to whiten teeth with whitening strips, but we suggest you look into our home remedies for teeth whitening. So let's discover how to whiten teeth naturally fast at home.

One of the reasons we brush our teeth is to increase the saliva in our mouths to provide our teeth the necessary remineralization that occurs from contact with lots of saliva.  However, if we brush with activated charcoal on a daily basis, our concern is the charcoal’s binding ability will tie up the minerals necessary and inhibit this important remineralizing action of saliva.
Teeth whitening strips may be more appropriate for the person who has more yellow teeth. These are plastic strips coated on one side with hydrogen peroxide. They can be used nightly for two to four weeks depending upon the degree to which you want to produce a lighter shade. They still are not as effective as dental whitening, but they can create lighter teeth. Most four-week kits cost between 20-40 USD. The strips don’t necessarily adhere completely to the teeth, and there may be more whitening in front than in the back of each tooth.
Turmeric powder can also help lighten the color of your teeth. It is naturally antibacterial and anti-inflammatory, which can also help with inflamed gums. Dip your toothbrush into the powder and brush for about 2-3 minutes. Rinse well and follow with your regular toothpaste. This can also be done twice a week. I don’t like the flavor of turmeric, so I combine it with orange essential oil to enhance the flavor. (Find organic turmeric root powder here.)
Now, berries do contain many beneficial antioxidants and other compounds that can benefit the health of your teeth, but their role in dental health is likely tied to the benefits of an overall healthy diet for your teeth. Foods that can help keep your gums and teeth strong, plus free from diseases or signs of aging, include teeth-strengthening foods like: (7)
I’ve struggled with staining/yellowish teeth for quite some time due to my “rough” enamel (which my hygienist diagnosed, explaining that it tends to grab onto stains). A good cleaning at the dentist’s would always restore my teeth to their normal whiteness but the yellowing would return quickly and no amount of activated charcoal, oil pulling or baking soda would help. I decided to try baking soda brushing followed by coconut oil pulling twice daily after my most recent cleaning, which was just before this past Christmas. And I’m thrilled to report that my regimen is working! My teeth still feel very clean and look shiny and white (in a normal way, not blindingly white of course). I used whitening strips in my 20s to achieve this but they made my teeth horribly sensitive. I’m so happy to have found a solution to this frustrating and embarrassing issue! I simply brush with a pinch of baking soda, concentrating on my front teeth, and then rinse and swish with coconut oil for 10-15 min, morning and night. It really works. 🙂
One thing to be aware of when it comes to whitening teeth is that certain natural whiteners can eradicate enamel. Some teeth whiteners are just not a good idea to use, especially lemon juice. While the lemon peel is actually a good, healthy way to whiten teeth, the juice itself is simply too strong. The acid in the actual lemon juice does great for bleaching clothes, hair and getting stains out of furniture, but you wouldn’t want to put lemon juice on your teeth as a mouth gum cleaner every single day. Eventually, the acid creates tiny holes in your teeth, and then every kind of staining type food will seep into these tiny holes and remain there. The acid from the lemons is so strong it just eventually wears away the teeth, causing cavities.
Fluoride is a naturally occurring mineral found in water. Toothpastes with fluoride help prevent tooth decay by strengthening your tooth enamel and fighting away bacteria that cause cavities. Fluoride toothpaste is also recommended for toddlers and children but in a lower percentage. Too much fluoride can weaken the enamel. For children younger than three years, an amount equal to a grain of rice is enough. For children aged three to six years, use a pea-sized amount of fluoride toothpaste.
Thanks for the supportive words. It’s fine to oil pull with amalgam fillings. It’s important to grasp that amalgam fillings off gas 24/7. They give off more mercury vapor when stimulated. Most common ‘stimulants’ are hot drinks, brushing, dental cleanings, and chewing. I really don’t think that oil pulling would increase the risk of mercury vapor. And even if it did, my guess is the oil would tie it up and you spit out the mercury with the oil.
In the morning, before you brush your teeth, scoop out a tablespoon or a little less (depending on the size of your mouth) of coconut oil. You can either soften it, or just put it in your mouth (I usually do the latter, and just let it soften.) Push, swish, and “pull” the oil through and around your teeth for 10-15 minutes, then spit it out, rinse with water, and brush your teeth.
Something that I’ve been using that really helps give me that alert, natural energy is maca powder. It’s a root powder that has been used forever. You can buy just the powder (it sort of tastes like butterscotch, but it’s not sweet) or buy it in capsules. The capsules are easier, but if you can regularly drink the powder, it seems a bit more effective.
Calcium supplements derived from oyster shells, dolomite, and bone meal are best avoided as they may contain lead, which can cause anemia, damage to the brain and kidneys, raise blood pressure and cause poisoning. Calculus (tartar) on your teeth may also increase while using these supplements, so visit your dentist for a cleaning whenever you feel the deposits on your lower front teeth.
Get enough Vitamin D. Vitamin D helps your body absorb and use calcium. It is also beneficial for boosting your immune system to fight against bacteria, viruses and free radicals that can erode teeth. Getting enough vitamin D can help you maintain a healthy smile, strengthen bones and even help prevent various types of diseases and cancers. Here are some ways to make sure you get enough vitamin D:
Make a paste of baking soda and lemon juice. It will likely fizz and foam a bit. Wait for it to settle down and use this solution to brush your teeth. Rinse well. You don’t need to follow with your regular toothpaste, but you can if you wish. Lemon juice contains citric acid, so it can damage your teeth if used too often. Only do this once a week for best results.
Dip your toothbrush into a sea salt mixture. Instead of using toothpaste, dip your toothbrush into a sea salt mixture for 3–5 minutes, made by dissolving ½ teaspoon of salt in 1 fluid ounce of water, and brush your teeth with it. The salt temporarily increases the pH balance of your mouth, turning it into an alkaline environment in which germs and bacteria cannot survive.

NOTE: My experience is that most doctors, dentists, chiropractors, and even lawyers are good, caring people who want to help others. However, many wonderful, effective, safe advances in all these fields never reach the field doctors at all due to politics at the top. These advances seldom are taught in colleges, or at seminars, or published in their journals. Then politically appointed “disciplinary boards” intimidate and harass anyone who does not follow the often obsolete and generally expensive status quo.

I think you are right on with your thinking here. Incidentally, on the Mohr’s scale of hardness (where diamonds are 10), ironically activated charcoal is only around 2. However, your point about RDA for charcoal is another subject all together. I don’t know the RDA for activated charcoal by itself, but my guess is it’s pretty high. My reasoning for this guess is a company who makes a tooth powder that uses activated charcoal as one of it’s ingredients states that the RDA for their product is 117. Yikes! Sure, it’s lower than some ‘whitening’ commercial pastes on the market, but that’s not a very high standard to judge one’s product safety.


I’ve struggled with staining/yellowish teeth for quite some time due to my “rough” enamel (which my hygienist diagnosed, explaining that it tends to grab onto stains). A good cleaning at the dentist’s would always restore my teeth to their normal whiteness but the yellowing would return quickly and no amount of activated charcoal, oil pulling or baking soda would help. I decided to try baking soda brushing followed by coconut oil pulling twice daily after my most recent cleaning, which was just before this past Christmas. And I’m thrilled to report that my regimen is working! My teeth still feel very clean and look shiny and white (in a normal way, not blindingly white of course). I used whitening strips in my 20s to achieve this but they made my teeth horribly sensitive. I’m so happy to have found a solution to this frustrating and embarrassing issue! I simply brush with a pinch of baking soda, concentrating on my front teeth, and then rinse and swish with coconut oil for 10-15 min, morning and night. It really works. 🙂
The only thing I don’t particularly care for with Tom’s is that they add XYLITOL to it, which is deadly to dogs if they somehow get hold of it. I just have to make sure our new cat doesn’t get stupid, steal the toothpaste off the bathroom counter and leave it where my dachshunds can find it! She hasn’t shown any homicidal tendencies yet, but with a cat, one never knows………. 😉
Whilst these remedies might be “natural” and might show results for “whiter” teeth, they are not healthy for the oral cavity. Although products such as baking soda have been used as home care adjuncts for decades, it can be destructive to both the teeth and gums. Baking soda is much too abrasive to use on the teeth. You might not see negative results after one use, but long-term use can cause abrasion and recession. Abrasion and recession can then lead to tooth sensitivity, cavities, and most importantly periodontal disease (which would render treatment more costly than professional whitening). Also-when whitening, you are not changing the color of the enamel. Whitening targets the dentin of the tooth not the enamel. However, I agree that it is important to use products to strengthen enamel. Products containing fluoride are great for strengthening the enamel.
First of all, one of the reasons why you are looking at how to whiten teeth naturally fast at home is probably because you already know that professional teeth whitening is nor cheap, neither is healthy. Professional teeth whitening can leave your teeth very sensitive and weak. So, since it is possible, you should try and whiten your teeth naturally at home.

Eat more crunchy fruits and vegetables. A big part of keeping your teeth clean involves eating the right foods.[23][24][25][26] Naturally crunchy foods contain fiber, which helps increase saliva production in your mouth, removing many of the sugars and chemicals that can cause tooth decay. About 20 minutes after you eat something, your saliva begins to reduce the effects of the acids and enzymes attacking your teeth. Additionally, saliva contains traces of calcium and phosphate, which can also restore minerals to areas of teeth that have lost them from the bacterial acids.


Over-the-counter tray and gels have been around the longest. Known as a “boil and bite” system, they require you to heat a tray, fill it with gel, and place the formed tray in your mouth. This whitening method takes weeks to deliver results, and 80 percent of users report sensitivity due to the breakdown of the carbamide peroxide gel. While the tray helps prevent oxygen from escaping, there are other options that can lead to efficacious whitening without the soft tissue irritation and pain. 

Malic acid in apples boosts saliva to wash away acids. Toothpastes with bromelain, a compound in pineapple, help whiten teeth. But there's no evidence that eating these fruits will make your grin gleam. Skip the strawberries, too. A study in Operative Dentistry found that brushing with a mixture of them and baking soda had no whitening effects. Even worse, the citric acid in strawberries can break down enamel, the outer shell of your tooth.
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