If the “silver” is actually amalgam, which is usually what silver or metal fillings are, it is actually mercury mixed with several other metals. The benefit for dentists is that it can be placed securely over moist surfaces, such as your teeth. There is some debate as to whether or not the oil reacts with the amalgam and produces some sort of toxicity as it is “pulling” the mercury’s toxins out-but from my knowledge and research, many people report oil pulling with amalgam and do just fine, and I have yet to find a solid report on any “poisoning.” If you’re concerned you can always ring the dentist, but I suspect you’d be fine 😉

Thanks to Wellness Mama I’ve added both charcoal and oil pulling to my routine. Both do a great job of cleaning and whitening my teeth. After soaking my teeth in charcoal for 5 minutes, I spit but do not rinse. Then I pop coconut oil in my mouth and swish for 20 minutes. This way I’m oil pulling with an oil/charcoal mix which has extra cleaning and whitening power. As a bonus the oil does a fantastic job of cleaning the black off my teeth.
Teeth bleaching products should only be used under the guidance of your dentist. Remember that whitening treatments may work temporarily but likely not for long. The best way to whiten your teeth is by feeding your body lots of healthy foods (these are also important for strong bones), brushing and rinsing your teeth and gums every day, plus working on omitting coffee, tea and sugary foods in your diet. The very first step you should take: If you smoke, stop smoking! And of course, no matter what your age, show your teeth some love by brushing with a natural, non-irritating toothpaste every day.
Underneath the enamel is a pale brown substance called dentin, which can become more visible when enamel gets thinner — a very common occurrence for many adults. (2) Dental erosion (erosive tooth wear) results from chronic loss of dental hard tissue that is chemically etched away from the tooth surface by acid and/or chelation (without bacterial involvement). (3) What are some of the reasons enamel thins? Risk factors include aging, genetics and intake of foods that promote erosion and/or staining. Many of these same unhealthy habits also increase your risk for gum disease.
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