Teeth bleaching products should only be used under the guidance of your dentist. Remember that whitening treatments may work temporarily but likely not for long. The best way to whiten your teeth is by feeding your body lots of healthy foods (these are also important for strong bones), brushing and rinsing your teeth and gums every day, plus working on omitting coffee, tea and sugary foods in your diet. The very first step you should take: If you smoke, stop smoking! And of course, no matter what your age, show your teeth some love by brushing with a natural, non-irritating toothpaste every day.

The baking soda and lemon juice works but it is best done by mixing fresh on a daily basis and not by storing since the acid in the lemon and most of the other properties of the lemon mixed with the baking soda effect the way the paste performs. Try it for a week then give it a break though since you don’t want to damage the enamel of your teeth. It definitely made my white!
An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. Foods including dark berries and drinks such as coffee, red wine, and soda are known offenders, but you don't have to give them up. Enjoy these in moderation, and rinse with water right afterward so there's less chance they'll affect your teeth. (Wait 30 minutes before brushing to protect the enamel.)
With each decade that we age, our teeth can get up to one to two shades darker. The color pigments inside teeth become more prominent as the dentin structure below the enamel grows. Consider the enamel to be like translucent glass, with the dentin structure shining through underneath, giving us our tooth color. Genetics play a large role in the darkening of our teeth extrinsically and intrinsically, but environmental factors, oral hygiene, and nutrition also contribute to the shade of our teeth.
One simple strategy can help maintain white teeth: brush. Brush at least twice daily. Even better, brush after every meal and snack. Brushing helps prevent stains and yellow teeth, especially at the gum line. Both electric and sonic toothbrushes may be superior to traditional toothbrushes in removing plaque and surface stains on teeth. Also, don't forget to floss and use an antiseptic mouthwash daily.
I grew up using Crest with fluoride, brushing within 5 minutes after finishing a meal… (I’ve only ever had three cavities, one of which the dentist gave me when he jabbed his pick into a molar.) After about 30-35 years my teeth began to get really sensitive, so I switched to the various sensitive toothpastes, again with fluoride. About two years ago (I’m almost 59 now), I began reading about fluoride’s effects on teeth and the body, including how FLUORIDE STAINS TEETH YELLOW/BROWN. So I switched to Tom’s no-fluoride toothpaste. I don’t know if it’s just wishful thinking, or an actuality, but I believe my teeth are getting whiter – and I still drink a quart of hot regular black tea (4 teabags’ worth in a Mason jar) every morning! There’s natural fluoride in the tea, but cutting out the fluoride toothpaste has made a world of difference AND my teeth aren’t sensitive anymore, either! I think the sensitivity was also brought on by all that fluoride! Any time I tried to switch off the sensitive pastes to a regular toothpaste, or even between brands of the sensitive types, the inner lining of my mouth would slough off in sheets (as in peeling skin after a bad sunburn), my teeth would just throb, and I’d go back to the sensitive paste. When I went to the Tom’s, my mouth lining was fine, my teeth never hurt, and they seem to be getting whiter! HOORAY!!!

Choose the right floss. Flossing is one the most important steps in your dental care routine besides brushing.[8] Commercial floss is made from synthetic nylon or plastic filaments. It is often treated with flavoring agents, such as mint or lemon, artificial sweeteners and sugar alcohols, such as xylitol and mannitol, to make flossing more pleasant. They may also be waxed with beeswax or plant-based wax for ease of use. Keep in mind, however, that there is no difference in the effectiveness of waxed or unwaxed floss.


With each decade that we age, our teeth can get up to one to two shades darker. The color pigments inside teeth become more prominent as the dentin structure below the enamel grows. Consider the enamel to be like translucent glass, with the dentin structure shining through underneath, giving us our tooth color. Genetics play a large role in the darkening of our teeth extrinsically and intrinsically, but environmental factors, oral hygiene, and nutrition also contribute to the shade of our teeth.
To oil pull, simply put a spoonful of coconut oil in your mouth and swish it between your teeth for five to 20 minutes, or add a few drops to your toothbrush and brush it on. Another oral care option is to apply coconut oil to a corner of a clean washcloth and rub it on the teeth. A bonus regarding coconut pulling? Coconut oil has antimicrobial properties, so it’s great for protecting and cleaning your gums as well.
×